Archive for the ‘CHILDREN AT RISK!’ Category

NEW BOOKLET: A Christian Parent’s Guide to POKÉMON

LTRP Note: While this new booklet by Lois Putnam might not be of interest to everyone of our readers, we believe it is a vitally important tool for parents, grandparents, and teens who are trying to figure out whether Pokémon or Pokémon GO is OK or not from a spiritual standpoint.

NEW BOOKLET: A Christian Parent’s Guide to POKÉMON by Lois Putnam is our newest Lighthouse Trails Booklet Tract.  The Booklet is 18 pages long and sells for $1.95 for single copies. Quantity discounts are as much as 50% off retail. Our Booklets are designed to give away to others or for your own personal use. Below is the content of the booklet. To order copies of A Christian Parent’s Guide to POKÉMON, click here. 

bkt-lp-pok-sA Christian Parent’s Guide to POKÉMON

By Lois Putnam

For Pokémon Go gamers, their “Gotta Mantra” is “Gotta Catch ‘Em All!”—Pokémon that is. However, a Christian’s motto must be: “Gotta Know, Gotta Learn, Gotta Discern, Gotta Go!” And just what it is that we as born again believers gotta know, gotta learn, gotta discern, and gotta go will be the theme of this booklet.

It was on July 6, 2016, via one’s smartphone, that players could download a free app and get set up to head outdoors to begin to catch Pokémon Pocket Monsters. Soon befuddled folks were bumping into gamers congregating at designated PokeStops be it at a church, a parking lot, a body of water, a library, a museum, a park, or the mall to name a few. Since this began, the Pokémon Go Mania has taken the country, and a number of other countries, by storm.

TV hosts, You Tube video makers, newspaper reporters, and online authors alike have scrambled to describe exactly how these frenzied gamers were zipping Pokémon balls on their phones to catch Pokémon seemingly popping up all over the place. Meantime, all kinds of safety issues were cropping up–kids in the middle of streets, folks walking into objects, a pair walking off a cliff, and even unsavory characters luring kids into unsafe places. All of this madness was taking place over one hundred and fifty-one little characters of which some seemed to be cute and clever, while others really are violent, ugly, and frightening. So with this in mind, what is it that we gotta know?

Gotta Know

At the outset, we gotta know some basic Pokémon info—such as the game of Pokémon, designed by Satoshi Tajiri in the 1990s, is managed by the Pokémon Company which, according to Wikipedia, is a Japanese consortium between Nintendo, Game Freak, and Creatures. Tajiri designed these Pokémon characters so gamers known as “Pokémon Trainers could catch and train to battle each other for sport.”

Officially introduced in 1996, Pokémon celebrated its twentieth anniversary in 2016. The new phenomenon Pokémon GO is an augmented reality game currently using the original Generation I Pokémon beginning with Bulbasaur to Mew. However, it’s important to know that now there are 722 Pokémon figures, which means in the last twenty years 571 more have been designed influencing youth and adults via video games, trading card games, comic books, TV shows, movies, and toys.1 Pokémon website, Poké, is filled with info you gotta know in order to be able to interact with Pokémon Goers! It includes a Pokedex, TV Programs, Trading Card Games, Video Games, A Shop, Attend Events, Pokémon GO and more! It even has a Trading Card Game Tutorial where one can learn to play the card game. Two sections: “The Pokedex,” and “Pokémon GO” are explained further below.2

The Pokedex

If you visit the Pokémon site, you can get to know individual Pokémon—their pictures, statistics, types, strengths/weaknesses, evolution, T.V. episodes, and cards. Under Pokedex, one example of a Pokémon is Haunter. The description of him states:

Haunter is a dangerous Pokémon. If one beckons you while floating in darkness, you must never approach it. This Pokémon will try to lick you with its tongue and steal your life away.3

You will also learn that this gas ghost can “levitate.” Haunter’s card moves include tongue spring, hidden poison, psyshot, sleep poison, haunt, dream eater, Gothic fear, and hoodwink to name some. How gruesome! No doubt this Pokémon has given kids horrific nightmares!

Pokémon Go

On the Pokémon website, you can learn all about Pokémon Go. There are sections on “Pokémon Go Plus,” “Explore Pokémon,” “Teams and Gyms,” and “In App Purchases” where you can find out more game details. “Explore Pokémon” gives blow by blow info about how the game is played including safety, catching a Pokémon, completing one’s Pokedex, the traits of Pokémon, Pokémon evolution, and Pokémon eggs. Out of all this, one has “gotta know” that the goal of this game is: “Gotta Catch ‘Em All”—yes, almost all of the original 151 from the Kanto Region.

Gotta Learn

The Pokémon (Gotta Catch ‘Em All)—Deluxe Essential Handbook: The Need-to-Know Stats and Facts on Over 700 Pokémon is a useful tool to help grandparents, parents, family, and friends learn much more about Pokémon.

Published by Scholastic in 2015, this information-packed book with its glitzy golden title lettering and its shiny Pokémon pics begs one to open its cover.

But, before one opens the book, carefully look at the deceptive Pokémon ball-like pics on the cover. When you do, you’ll note most of the pics are happy and smiley, making the Pokémon appear as if they are just a bunch of cuddly stuffed animals. However, when you open the book, you’ll realize how alluring and deceptive the cover art is, for the Pokémon are anything but cuddly; rather they are often hideous and evil looking.

Title Page: The title page, done in Pokémon logo colors of deep blue, golden yellow, and white, has the Pokémon mantra “Gotta Catch ‘Em All” below the Pokémon logo. Then it once again restates the title, and lists the publisher Scholastic Inc.

Scholastic Books—the book club used by teachers all over the USA!

Welcome Page: In the Welcome Pages of the book, there is a two-page spread highlighting the red page on the left with the rainbow-horned fairy Xerneas sprinting onto the page, while on the right on the blue page there’s: Welcome to the World of Pokémon.” Below the welcome is listed the six Pokémon regions—Kanto, Johto, Hoenn, Sinnoh, Unova, and Kalos—each full of fascinating Pokémon.

This book also lists the Pokémon picture, type, species, height, and weight, which “can make all the difference in Gym battles, in the wild, and anywhere else you might meet Pokémon.”4 Besides, this deluxe handbook, it is said, will enable “Trainers” to master any Pokémon challenge.

How To Use This Book: This two-page section goes into detail about each Pokémon’s name, pronunciation, height and weight, description, evolution, mega evolution, type, and region. It is such info that one has “gotta know and learn” to equip oneself to answer anyone questioning whether this is “just an innocent game.” Along with Scripture, it is knowledge that one can use when a “Deuteronomy Moment” comes. For as Deuteronomy 6:6,7 reads:

And these words which I command thee this day, shall be in thine heart: And thou shalt teach them diligently unto thy children, and shalt talk of them when thou sittest in thine house, and when thou walkest by the way, and when thou liest down, and when thou risest up.

Guide to Pokémon Types: The next pages explain the eighteen Pokémon types: fire, grass, water, normal, electric, bug, ghost, flying, fighting, psychic, steel, rock, ground, ice, poison, dark, dragon, and fairy. This ends the seven pages of explanatory notes, and begins the ABC pages which begin on page eight with “Abomasnow” to page four hundred and thirty-two which finishes with “Zygarde.” In between are seven hundred more Pokémon to scrutinize.

To Conclude: I would highly recommend purchasing this book as you can back up your stories and words with the Pokémon pictures and info thus adding weight to your warnings.

Gotta Notice the Names

Many Pokémon names* say “Watch out!”: Names such Abra-Psi Pokémon, Absol-Disaster Pokémon, Alakazam-Psi Pokémon, Arbok-Cobra Pokémon, Arceus-Alpha Pokémon, Beheeyem-Cerebral Pokémon, Carvanha-Savage Pokémon, Chandelure- Luring Pokémon, Cofagrigus-Coffin Pokémon, Darkrai-Pitch Black Pokémon, Darumaka-Zen-Charm Pokémon, Dialga-Temporal Pokémon, Dragonair-Dragon Pokémon, Drapion-Ogre Scorpion Pokémon,  Eevee-Evolution Pokémon, Delphox-Fox Pokémon, Flylon-Mystic Pokémon, Gengar-Shadow Pokémon, Giratina-Renegade Pokémon, Gothitelle-Astral Body Pokémon, Gothorita-Manipulate Pokémon, Gourgeist-Pumpkin Pokémon, Gyarados-Atrocious Pokémon, Houndoom-Dark Pokémon, Hypno-Hypnosis Pokémon, Jynx-Human Shape Pokémon, Kirlia-Emotion Pokémon, Krookodile-Intimidation Pokémon, Lampent-Lamp Pokémon, Latias-Eon Pokémon , Lucario-Aura Pokémon, Manectric-Discharge Pokémon, Mawile-Deceiver Pokémon, Medicham- Meditate Pokémon, Mew-New Species Pokémon, Mewtwo-Genetic Pokémon, Mismagius- Magical Pokémon, Munna-Dream Eater Pokémon, Ninetales-Fox Pokémon, Riolu-Emanation Pokémon, Sigilyph-Avianoid Pokémon, Spiritomb-Forbidden Pokémon, Thunderdurus-Bolt Strike Pokémon, Uxie-Knowledge Pokémon, Xatu-Mystic Pokémon ,Yamask-Spirit Pokémon, Yvetal-Destruction Pokémon. These are but a few of many to watch out for!

Delphox, the Fire-Psychic Pokémon, is one name to notice! Its name has two parts which is a combo of the “Oracle of Delphi” and “fox.” However, even before I found that info, I used to find synonyms for psychic, occult, witch etc. Under occult, I noticed “Delphian,” and “Delphic.” I wondered if any Pokémon had a name similar to this, and sure enough there was the mystical Delphox. Looking up “Delphox” on Poké, I found this was a fox with the elements of a witch or mage. My Pokémon handbook further said it held a flaming branch in its hand upon which it focused its eyes giving it psychic visions helping it to see into the future. After reading about the “Oracle of Delphi,” Delphox’s story became even clearer. This then can be woven into the Acts 16 story that involves the Oracle at Delphi.5

*Note: Pokémon names were first written in Japanese and later changed into more suitable names for English-speaking gamers. (“The community-driven Pokémon encyclopedia”) is a site that can provide much additional insight by clicking onto the “Origin” section., by the way, is named after Generation One’s first Pokémon Bulbasaur.6

Gotta Notice the Types, the Moves, and the Illustrations

Altogether, there are eighteen types, and oh, the evil behind these types. Words cannot even describe the things these characters are teaching innocent young children and youth. As I researched the game handbook, a good number of the 700+ Pokémon were “Psychic” with psychic terminology, moves, and stories.

The adjectives describing the game moves would make up one eye-opening glossary with most having absolutely horrendous names. Be sure to peruse “Possible Moves” in the handbook or on a Pokémon info site noting the viciousness of many and evilness of others. This activity alone—the noting of the descriptive names for each move—will surely enable one to discern that this game is literally overflowing with words, concepts, and teachings far removed from the Bible.

Pause and consider the possible moves for Banette, a ghost puppet-like Pokémon that, like a voodoo doll, sticks itself with pins to curse others! Its moves are: knock-off, screech, night shade, curse, spite, will-o-wisp, shadow sneak, feint attack, hex,* shadow ball, sucker punch, embargo, snatch, and grudge trick. Stop and imagine youngsters seven and up familiarizing themselves with such a character. Bulbapedia says, “Banette is a . . . doll-like Pokémon that is possessed with pure hatred.”

[*A hex is: to practice witchcraft; to put a hex on; and to affect as an evil spell: jinx. Synonyms are: charm, enchant, bewitch, overlook, spell, strike. Related words are: curse, jinx, possess, voodoo, attract, beguile, captivate, mesmerize, spellbind, entice, lure, seduce, tempt. (Merriam-Webster) Deuteronomy 18:10-14 makes it very clear what God thinks of those who use witchcraft or other practices named in this piece. It reads: “There shall not be found among you any one that maketh his son or daughter to pass through the fire, or that useth divination, or observer of times, or a witch, Or a charmer, or a consulter with familiar spirits, or a wizard, or a necromancer. For all these things are an abomination unto the Lord.”]

Another need-to-notice activity would be to flip through the book or scroll through a site with all of the Pokémon pics and simply notice the ferocious or scary looking parts of each character. Just a few pages into this, anyone with a smidgen of discernment would have to concede that these atrocious characters have no place in the life of a precious young child or teen. For Philippians 4:8 declares, “whatsoever things are true, whatsoever things are honest, whatsoever things are just, whatsoever things are pure, whatsoever things are lovely, whatsoever things are of good report; if there be any virtue, and if there be any praise, think on these things.”

Gotta Know Pokémon Back Stories

Highlighted here are back stories about various types of Pokémon—stories one can easily recall to share with others who need to become aware of just how deceptive the Pokémon agenda is.

Some Third Eye Pokémon:

Dark: Absol: Disaster Pokémon: George Hutcheon, Bulbapedia contributor, shares that Absol is based on a “Bai Ze,” a creature from both China and Japan who warned good rulers of impending disaster. In Japan, images of the Bai Ze were made into “good luck charms” to ward off monsters and disease. Absol, says Hutcheon, resembles this monster with its dark horn, feline shape, and black oval third eye.*7

Ghost/Poison: Mega Gengar: Shadow Pokémon: Gengar is a “third eye” Pokémon with an oval yellow third eye on its forehead. Its “malicious,” says Bulbapedia, laughing at and delighting in its victim’s terror. It hides in the shadows hoping to attack its prey and enjoys casting curses. How horrible is this powerful mega Pokémon which has evolved from the evil Gengar with his sinister leer and giant teeth. Its “moves” include hypnosis, curses, night shade, sucker punch, dream eater, dark pulse, hex, and nightmare.

Steel/Psychic: Jirachi: Wish Pokémon: Jirachi is another Pokémon which has a hidden third-eye or “true eye” concealed within a seam. Its eye is said to absorb energy to aid in its hibernation. If awakened, it might grant your wish if you write it on one of its tags and sing to it with a pure voice.

The Psychic Third Eye Trading Card: The Trading Card Game has a supporter card labeled “The Psychic Third Eye.”8

[*A third eye is: “A point on the forehead corresponding to one of the chakras in yoga, often depicted as an eye and associated with enlightenment and mystical insight.” (Free Dictionary)]

Aura Pokémon:

Fighting/Steel: Lucario: Aura** Pokémon: Canine-like Lucario (evolved from Aura Pokémon Riolu) raises its four aura appendages to read and manipulate its opponents’ aura. Aura Sphere or “wave bomb” is its very special battle move. Mega Lucario becomes even more ferocious with additional spikes coming from its hands, feet, and shoulders. As its aura heightens, black patches appear on its body. It’s said too that it can activate crystallized Time Flowers by shooting out aura.

Ghost-Dragon: Giratina Original/Altered Forme: Renegade Pokémon: Dragonic, demonic appearing Giratina in either form was banished, the Pokémon handbook states, to another dimension where all is distorted and reversed. Like Lucario, Giratina battles with “Aura Sphere.”

Aura Guardians: In the Pokémon world, Aura Guardians sense aura and control its power.

Aura Capabilities: Bulbapedia lists aura capabilities as being able to read minds/actions of others, sense other auras, view through objects, project aura barriers, transfer aura to others, and activate Time Flowers.

[**An Aura (in Japanese means “wave-guiding”) is: an energy field that is held to emanate from a living being (Merriam-Webster) ]

Meditation Pokémon Trio:

Fighting-Psychic: Meditite: Meditate Pokémon: Meditite’s Japanese name is “Asanan” which comes from “asana,” a name for various yogic poses. It does such intense meditation it nearly starves itself never missing daily Yoga practice. This routine, says the handbook, intensifies its inner strength. Meditite also levitates. Pics of Meditite can be found sitting in a lotus position with each hand fixed in a mudra.

Fighting-Psychic: Medicham and Mega Medicham: Medicham meditates so much it has developed a sixth sense. Its picture shows it doing a yogic asana with its hands held in a mudra position. Some say Medicham resembles a good luck charm doll known as a “Daruma doll.”*

[*A Daruma doll is: a hollow and round Japanese wish doll with no arms or legs modeled after Bodhi-dharma, the founder and first patriarch of Zen.]

Hypnotic Dream-Eating Pokémon:

Psychic: Drowzee: Hypnosis Pokémon: Drowzee lurks nearby to draw out dreams. Drowzee, a dream eater tapir-like Baku-based Pokémon, uses moves that include hypnosis, meditate, zen-headbutt, psychic, psybeam, poison gas, psyshock, and future sight plus more.

Psychic: Hypno: Hypnosis Pokémon: Hypno uses a pendulum for putting one into a hypnotic trance. Hypno, too, is able to sense what its victim is dreaming. A movie “Hyno’s Naptime” tells how Hypno’s sleep waves have caused children to disappear and Pokémon to grow sleepy.

Psychic: Munna: Dream Eater Pokémon: If Munna, a Baku inspired blimp-like Pokémon eats a happy dream, it gives off pink mist. Some of Munna’s moves include: lucky chant, hypnosis, nightmare, future sight, dream eater, and telekinesis.

Psychic: Musharna: Drowsing Pokémon: Musharna resembles a tapir-like pink pig with its dream stream coming out of its forehead. Some say Musharna seems like a traditional Japanese incense burner called a “koro” that appears on Buddhist altars.

Baku: M. R. Reese of Green Shinto writes that a Japanese child having a nightmare is told if they wake up to repeat “Baku-san, come eat my dream!” three times. After, the legend says, the Baku will enter the room and eat up the bad dreams. However, this mustn’t be overdone or it will devour their hopes and desires leaving them with an empty life. Kids to this day keep “Baku Talisman” by their bedsides. An online site offers a ring, said to have the Baku spirit in it, that one could wear or hang up for protection.9

Psychic Pokémon:

The Psi Quartet: Abra, Kadabra, Alakazam, and Mega Alakazam: These four “Psi” Pokémon, all of the Psychic type, possess many powers. Abra’s signature move is to “teleport” away. Kadabra uses one spoon to greatly increase its powers. Super intelligent Alakazam has two spoons. Lastly, Mega Alakazam has five spoons over head while seated in a lotus position with each hand fixed in mudra. He, records Bulbapedia, is based on a wizard or sorcerer or a Hindu sadhus–a holy man who is a yogi. A Wikipedia article on “Sadhus” has quite a photo display of many holy men with their prominent third eye markings.10

Ghost/Spirit Pokémon:

Ghost Pokémon: Yamask: Spirit Pokémon: Yamask, a very disturbing Pokémon, has a Japanese name Desumasu which comes from death and mask. It also means “Yama” or Lord of the Dead in Buddhism/Hinduism and “weeping mask” in Chinese. It’s based, too, on the Egyptian Ba holding a death mask. Pokedex entries say its mask makes it cry as it wanders around ancient landmarks. Should one accidentally wear this mask, it can be “possessed.” On a post titled “Pokemanical,” a gamer shares stories of really dark Pokémon especially ghosts as Yamask and Cofagrigus. A picture of some of the worst of the worst Pokémon has a comment that says, “Yet still allowable as kids’ game. Huh!”11

Ghost Pokémon: Cofagrigus: Coffin Pokémon: This coffin Pokémon, who lurks in tombs and ruins, is an Egyptian sarcophagus that eats people and mummifies them! Grave robbers who come too close to its shadowy ebony hands find themselves locked inside Cofagrigus. Its name is a combo of sarcophagus and egregious which means coffin and grim. And grim they are!

Light Pokémon: “A Ghost-Fire Trio”:

Ghost/Fire: Litwick: Candle Pokémon: This small candle has a purple flame that’s powered by “life energy.”To get this energy Litwick, a pretender, seems to light the way through darkness all the while sucking life energy from its victim. A Bulbapedia description says, “Litwick leads people astray and sucks out their life force.” What an apt description of Satan! For 2 Corinthians says, “And no marvel; for Satan himself is transformed into an angel of light.” And 1 Peter 5:8 adds, “Be sober, be vigilant; because your adversary the devil, as a roaring lion, walketh about seeking whom he may devour.”

In Bulpadedia “Origin” section, it says: Litwick’s name is a combo of hitodama or a blue, black, and purple flame associated with ghosts, yokai, and candles.

Ghost/Fire: Lampent: Lamp Pokémon: Lampent, an ominous Pokémon, lurks around hospitals “waiting for someone to die” at which time it absorbs their departing spirit which in turn fuels its flame. However, 2 Corinthians 5:8 says of those who die in the Lord that we are “absent from the body and present with the Lord!” And Hebrews 9:27 reads, “And as it is appointed unto men once to die, but after this the judgment.”

Ghost/Fire: Chandelure: Luring Pokémon: Third in this spirit sucking trio is Chandelure whose name is like a “sentient” chandelier and lure. Chandelure is based also on hitodama which Wikipedia defines as Japanese meaning “human souls” that are like balls of fire floating in the night—departed souls that have been separated from their bodies. The Deluxe Essential Handbook says, “Chandelure’s spooky fames can burn the spirit right out of someone. If that happens the spirit becomes trapped in this world endlessly wandering.” One of Chandelure’s “moves” in the game is to put a “hex” on someone.

The Kami Trio: Tornadus, Thundurus, and Landorus:

Flying: Tornadus: Legendary Cyclone Pokémon: Tornadus, a kami* of wind, is based on the Shinto god Fujin. Tornadus is a wizard-like Pokémon that is carrying a bag of wind.

Electric/Flying: Legendary Bolt Strike Pokémon: Thundurus, a kami of lightning and thunder, is inspired by one of the most feared of Japanese deities Raijin. It’s said of Raijin that if there’s a storm Japanese children were told to cover their belly buttons for Raijin might eat them. People prayed to Raijin for rain and lightning. A rice field hit by a lightning bolt, it was believed, would be fertile and produce a good harvest.12

Ground/Flying: Landorus: Legendary Abundance Pokémon: Bulbapedia states that Landorus was the master of this “Forces of Nature” kami trio. In the Pokémon universe region called “Unova,” there’s a shrine in honor of the “Great Landorus” named “The Abundant Shrine.” Landorus is based on a third kami—the Kami of Fertility—also named Inari.13

[*A Kami is: In the Shinto religion, kami are spirits/phenomena that are worshipped. According to Wikipedia: “They are elements in nature, animals, creationary forces in the universe, as well as spirits of the revered deceased.” Under “Etymology” Wikipedia notes: “Kami is the Japanese word for a god, deity, divinity, or spirit. It has been used to describe ‘mind,’ ‘God,’ ‘supreme being,’ ‘one of the Shinto deities,’ ‘an effigy,’ ‘a principle,’ and ‘anything that is worshipped.’” For further info: The Bible, however, in Exodus 20:3-5 says, “Thou shalt have no other gods before me. Thou shalt not make unto thee any graven image, or any likeness of any thing that is in heaven above, or that is in the earth beneath, or that is in water under the earth: Thou shalt not bow down thyself to them: for I the LORD they God am a jealous God.” ]

A Creator “God” Pokémon:

Normal: Arceus: Mythical Alpha Pokémon: Areceus is the god Pokémon of the Pokémon Universe. It’s based on a creator deity with a stance like an Egyptian bull or calf idols particularly Apis. It has an arc on its back, says Bulbapedia, that is used to represent reincarnation in Hinduism.

Arceus is connected to the Shinto gods Kunitokotachi and Amenominakanushi who summoned the first goddess and god Izanami and Izanagi to create Japan with a spear. The reference to its having 1000 arms comes from Buddhism. Arceus, it’s said, created Sinnoh, a Pokémon area, and the three Pokémon Lake Guardians Uxie, Azelf, and Mesprit and the Creation Trio Dialaga, Palkia, and Giratina.

Upon reading its English name, “Alpha Pokémon,” one can’t help but think about the biblical reference in Revelation 1:8 that declares, “I am Alpha and Omega, the beginning and the ending, saith the Lord, which is, and which was, and which is to come, the Almighty.”

These stories are but the tip of the iceberg as to what terms and concepts are being put into the receptive minds of our kids straight out of Shintoism, Buddhism, the New Age, and other pagan religions. As Matthew 6:33 says,
Seek ye first the kingdom of God and his righteousness, and all these things shall be added unto you.

And as the prayer the Lord taught us to pray which ends in Matthew 6:13 says:

And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil: For thine is the kingdom, and the power, and the glory, for ever.

Gotta Learn About the Shinto Connection

Shintoism in Pokémon: In a July 18, 2016 article titled “Pokémon Go and Its AR Universe,” Ray Tsuchiyama shows how much Pokémon is connected to Shintoism. Tsuchiyama says the Pokémon Go gamers out on their Pokémon hunts are “almost like a new religion of seekers.” Tsuchiyama says they are “seeing ‘otherworldly’ aural specter/image in the middle of the ‘material world’ of buildings, shower trees, and beaches.”14

Tsuchiyama recalls Satoshi Tajiri, the Pokémon founder, who was into his bug collecting world as a child, and later the anime character Ash with his electrifying Pikachu made to resemble Tajiri. Tsuchiyama says Tajiri’s childhood hobby surely contributed to Pokémon with all its curious critters. Tsuchiyama states:

But there is also the deeper cultural, mythological, and animist religious history of Japan that influenced this global game.15

Tsuchiyama goes on to show how closely Pokémon is tied to Shintoism when he writes:

[T]he Pokémon Shiftry evokes a Japanese goblin that lives in a tree and causes windstorms. Lombre probably has the greatest resemblance to the Kappa, a Japanese water demon. Ninetales is obviously the fox god in Shintoism. A Shinto reference is the creation of the Hoenn region (in the game) by Kyogre and Groudon, two Pokémon characters . . . A Shinto “world flood” myth has been worked in Mewtwo’s character.16

“In the original game,” maintains Tsuchiyama, “Pokémon trainers gather to mourn and present offering for ‘dead’ Pokémon, since without the chanting of the Pokémon ‘souls’ will wander the material world and transform into vengeful spirits–again evoking Shinto beliefs.”17

Tsuchiyama adds, “Pokémon characters clearly resemble Shinto gods that hang out in rivers, rocks, trees, and other places—and following Shinto, when offered food and incense, Pokémon and friends/allies bring players all sorts of rewards, like points (blessings?).”18

Tsuchiyama ends by noting that Pokémon GO isn’t the original “character hunting” mobile app. Tsuchiyama writes, “For years in Japan game firms like Yokai Watch and Monster Hunter have spawned thousands of small groups . . .  All these games are heavily influenced by Shinto Mythology.”19

Gotta Learn About the Yokai Connection

Yokai are: (ghost, phantom, or strange apparitions) a class of supernatural monsters, spirits, and demons in Japanese folklore. They can be anywhere from malevolent to mischievous, or even bring good fortune. Yokai can appear in different ways: as animals, as humans, as inanimate objects, or as shapeless. They have spiritual supernatural powers with obake shapeshifting being one of the most common ones.20

An informative article titled “Who’s That Pokémon? Yokai Edition” by Kristen Dexter starts out:

But some of my favorite Pokémon were inspired by yokai: supernatural monsters, ghosts, and phantoms of Japanese folklore. Says Kristen, “Gotta catch ‘em all, yokai!”21

Dexter lists the Japanese term for a particular yokai and its definition. She then asks: “Who’s that yokai?” After, there’s a large picture of each Pokémon that fits this definition and a further reference to its/their traits. Here’s what the yokai covers: Sazae Oni, turban shell ogres, like Slowbro and Slowking; Sogen Bi, a fireball floating head, like Gastly; Baku dream eaters, like Drowzee, Hypno, Munna, and Musharna; Jinmenju, human tree heads, like Exegguter; Yamauba, old woman turned witch, like Jnyx; Nekomata, Bake split tail cats, like Esperson; Nukekubi, cursed headless woman or girl, like Misdreavus; Kamitachi, ambusher attacker weasels, like Sneasel and Weavile; Futakushi Onna, two mouthed cursed woman, like Mawile; Tsukimogami, spirit inhabited inanimate objects, like Banette; Hitodama, graveyard colored light, like Litwick; Kodama, ball of light tree spirits, like Celebi, Phantump, and Trevenant; Chochin Obake, paper lantern inhabiters, like Dusclops and Dusknoir; Yuki Onna, evil woman freezer of travelers, like Froslass; and Nurarihyon, old man yokai leader, like Jellicent.22

Gotta Read Up on Church Reactions to PokÉmon GO

One last thing to look into and become aware of is the number of churches that have been designated Pokémon Go Pokestops and Gyms. Churches are crowing about how unbelievably wonderful it is that they have been named stopping places for Pokémon Go players to pick up items to help catch those hidden Pocket Monsters. Now, is it because most churches see it as a reason to share the Gospel with those that happen by, or is it because they think the game is clever and yes even fun and they get to share things like water, or a place to recharge smartphones? Unfortunately, it is the latter in many instances.

I read where an Episcopal church attendee declared if you’re going to do “evangelism,” you might as well have fun doing it. Another “millennial evangelical” opined all that old Pokémon is of the devil drivel, why that’s a thing of the past. He said that “there are 721 Pokémon to date, with more coming this fall, and not a single one of them has a devilish or Satanic sort of name or makeup.”23 How I’d challenge this uninformed millennial, or anyone else, regardless of age, to do the research using sources quoted in this booklet that show how infiltrated Pokémon is with every sort of evil idea that could be thought up. In fact, a verse that well describes Pokémon is Genesis 6:5 that reads:

And God saw that the wickedness of man was great in the earth, and that every imagination of his heart was only evil continually.

And as it was in the days of Noah, so it is today!

Gotta Discern, Gotta Go

In summary, once one grasps that Pokémon is inundated with deceptive teachings and occultic references, one must determine to research Pokémon lore and backstories to more fully discern the agenda, the culture, and the religion from which this game has arisen. The question then becomes: “What must one do with this information? Just as Berit Kjos, in her excellent 1999 article: “The Dangers of Role-Playing Games-How Pokémon and Magic Cards Affect the Minds,” listed ideas on how to teach one’s children or grandchildren on ways to resist occult entertainment, I too would urge parents, grandparents, and friends to be ready as Deuteronomy Moments arise; and during devotional times, talk to your children or grandchildren on a regular basis about key words and ideas presented in Pokémon and Pokémon Go and how they contrast with Scripture.

Point out that Proverbs describes the simple—the naive ones—as those who are open to anything that comes down the pike as contrasted to the wise—the knowledgeable ones—those who cry out and search for wisdom as to which paths to take. And as Solomon said in Proverbs 4:10-15:

Hear O my son, and receive my sayings; and the years of thy life shall be many. I have taught in the way of wisdom; I have led thee in the right paths. When thou goest thy steps shall not be straitened; and when thou runnest, thou shalt not stumble. Take fast hold of instruction; let her not go; keep her; for she is thy life. Enter not into the path of the wicked, and go not in the path of evil men. Avoid it, pass not by it, turn from it, and pass away.
What opportunities await informed Christians, who with both Scripture and pertinent Pokémon information, can clearly point out how deceptive and evil these alluring Pokémon are. Yes, we gotta be ready to go, for not only must we warn about Pokémon Go, but as Mark 16:15, a Bible go verse, reads, “Go ye into all the world, and preach the gospel to every creature.”

Ponder the path of thy feet, and let all thy ways be established. Turn not to the right hand nor to the left: remove thy foot from evil. (Proverbs 4:26, 27)
In this Pokémon Go world, how apt are these verses.

To order copies of A Christian Parent’s Guide to POKÉMON, click here. 

1. For more “gotta know” info, read “Pokémon” from Wikipedia article:
4. The Pokémon (Gotta Catch ‘Em All)—Deluxe Essential Handbook: The Need-to-Know Stats and Facts on Over 700 Pokémon (Scholastic, 2015).
5. See Related topics include: occult, Delphic, witch, wizard, mage, focus, psychic, psychic visions, oracle, Oracle at Delphi, Apollo, spirit of divination, and Acts 16.
6. “The community-driven Pokémon encyclopedia”:
7. George Hutcheon, “On the Origin of Species: Absol” (September 23, 2013,
9. M.D. Reese, “Baku, the Legend of the Dream Eater” (December 1, 2014,
10. For more, read “Abra, Kadabra, and Alakazam” at:,_Kadabra,_and_Alakazam.
11. “Pokemanical” (September 4, 2011,
14. Ray Tsuchiyama, “Pokémon Go and Its AR Universe” (July 18, 2016,
15. Ibid.
16. Ibid.
17. Ibid.
18. Ibid.
19. Ibid.
22. Kristen Dexter, “Who’s That Pokémon? Yōkai Edition!” (October 31, 2014,
23. Ibid.
24. Chris Martin (works at LifeWay Christian Resources), “Is Pokémon Satanic?” (Millennial Evangelical, July 15, 2015,

To order copies of A Christian Parent’s Guide to POKÉMON, click here. 

Share This!
Share On Twitter
Share On Pinterest
Share On Youtube
Contact us

School Replaces Detention with Meditation/Yoga

Photo credit: Holistic Life Foundation

Photo credit: Holistic Life Foundation

By Cedric Fisher
Truth Keepers

Baltimore’s Robert W. Coleman Elementary School is taking advantage of unknowledgeable or inattentive parents, to instruct vulnerable children in the practices of meditation and Yoga. Instead of sending unruly children to detention, they are sending them to the “Mindful Room”. There they are taught breathing exercises, meditation, and Yoga.

“Misbehaving kids are encouraged to sit in the room and go through practices like breathing or meditation, helping them calm down and re-center.” – This school replaced detention with meditation. The results are stunning, James Gaines, 9/22/2016, Upworthy (online)

What I find stunning and deeply disturbing, is the fact Christians have not risen up in strong protest, exposed this diabolical preying on their children, and demanded the school remove the program. The program, entitled Holistic Me, was established in partnership with the Holistic Life Foundation. According to the Foundation’s website, which pictures two children in meditating in yoga position, it claims to “serve” 4500 students weekly. One has to wonder if some children might create a disturbance just to get into the program. Holistic Me is active in over 14 schools, including at least one Christian school, Friends School of Baltimore. They claim that no school suspensions were issued to students who attend their program. According to the Baltimore school spokesperson, none of their participating students were suspended last year. They are crediting the program with reduction in fighting and other behavioral issues. Click here to continue reading.

Cedric Fisher is the director of Truth Keepers blog and the author of two Lighthouse Trails booklets.

Share This!
Share On Twitter
Share On Pinterest
Share On Youtube
Contact us

Nearly 9,000 Join Brief to Supreme Court in Support of School Board’s Refusal to Allow Girl in Boys’ Restroom

By Heather Clark
Christian News Network

WASHINGTON — Nearly 9,000 people added their names to a legal brief this past week in support of a Virginia school board’s appeal of a ruling requiring that it allow a female student who identifies as male to use the boys’ restroom.

8,914 students, parents and other residents from across the country included their name in the friend of the court brief filed by the religious liberties organization Alliance Defending Freedom (ADF) on Wednesday. Over 40 state family policy organizations, such as the Family Policy Institute of Washington, North Carolina Values, and the New Yorker’s Family Research Foundation, were a part of the brief as well.

“Placing students in circumstances where their privacy is compromised and they are at risk of bodily exposure in the vicinity of members of the opposite sex is not only demeaning and humiliating, but also denies individuals’ personal dignity,” it reads. Click here to continue reading.

Share This!
Share On Twitter
Share On Pinterest
Share On Youtube
Contact us

Second Man Found Guilty For Helping to Rescue Former Lesbian and Her Daughter

LTRP Note: Another case of the American courts seeking to scare the American public into submission by going after the minority in this country who will stand up for what is right.

“Virginia Man Found Guilty of ‘International Kidnapping’ for Helping Ex-Lesbian Flee Country With Daughter”

By Heather Clark
Christian News Network

BUFFALO, N.Y. — A Virginia man who was accused of helping an ex-lesbian flee the country with her daughter has been declared guilty of international parental kidnapping and conspiracy.

A jury handed down the verdict on Thursday after a nearly two-week trial, which centered not on whether businessman Philip Zodhiates of Waynesboro helped Lisa Miller seven years ago, but whether he did it out of the generosity of his heart or to keep the girl away from Miller’s ex-partner.

“We had a lot of evidence about intent,” Assistant U.S. Attorney Paul J. Van de Graaf, who served as one of the prosecutors in the case, told reporters following the verdict. “We also had strong evidence about the secrecy and deception used by the defendant.”

“Lisa’s secrecy and deception should not rub off on Philip,” argued Robert Hemley, one of Zodhiates’ defense attorneys. “There is no such thing as guilt by association.”

He faces up to eight years behind bars and a $500,000 fine. Zodhiates will be sentenced on January 30. Click here to continue reading.

Share This!
Share On Twitter
Share On Pinterest
Share On Youtube
Contact us

Bryce Homes Kenya Update

By Roger Oakland
(Director and founder of Understand the Times, International and Bryce Homes International)

If you have follow our reports from our Bryce Homes over the years you will see that we have a policy. It goes like this: We report, and you decide. We do not beg for money. We provide information with regard to specific needs as we see them and then let people respond according to their own desire.

We have also found that if we do not let people know about certain needs or problems, there is no response from the people. Obviously, with over 80 Homes in the Bryce Homes Program in seven countries, we cannot respond to every need. Nor do we feel that we are called to do so.

Our underlying motive in our program is to have the poor work towards self-sufficiency. However, it is obvious in many situations, hopelessness overpowers the ability to do much working until we can assist them out of hopelessness.

Widow Phoebe and her children

Widow Phoebe and her children

This coming month we feel led to tell you about the situation with Widow Phoebe and her four children in Kenya. The rains in Kenya right now are relentless and the temperature is very cool. Phoebe lives in a deplorable shack that has a leaky roof and no stove for heating. She cooks outdoors on a fire surrounded by three rocks on which she balances her pots. She has one mattress for herself and four children.

The bottom line is that we would like to construct Phoebe and her family a new home comparable to the others we have already constructed in Kenya for widows. She owns her own small plot of land. The three-room house would cost about $2500 to $3000. In the past, people have designated funds to Kenya for this purpose. Maybe someone or several others would respond to this need. With the resources that come in, we will build this house and others as God provides through His people.

Please click here to see more photos of Phoebe’s family and/or to help support this need. Thank you.


Share This!
Share On Twitter
Share On Pinterest
Share On Youtube
Contact us

NEW BOOKLET: HALLOWEEN! A Warning to Christian Parents

NEW BOOKLET:HALLOWEEN! A Warning to Christian Parents by Johanna Michaelsen is our newest Lighthouse Trails Booklet Tract.  The Booklet is 16 pages long and sells for $1.95 for single copies. Quantity discounts are as much as 50% off retail. Our Booklets are designed to give away to others or for your own personal use. Below is the content of the booklet. To order copies of HALLOWEEN! A Warning to Christian Parents, click here. 

Halloween! A Warning to Christian Parents

By Johanna Michaelsen

It was the night of Halloween, and ironically, I was working on a chapter about Halloween for my book Like Lambs to the Slaughter: Your Child and the Occult when the doorbell rang. I was greeted by an adorable bunch of little kids doing their level best to look like gruesome Witches and vampires. I bent down as I distributed apples and oranges in response to lusty cries of “trick or treat!”

“You kids want to know something?” I asked very softly.

“Yeah!” came a unanimous chorus.

“With the Lord Jesus, there is no trick. He loves every one of you very much.”

Several little faces beamed up at me through their ghoulish makeup. “That’s neat!” exclaimed one little girl. “Yeah!” chimed in a few others.

“This is Jesus’ night,” I said. Why I said that, I’m not really sure. I was poignantly aware of the fact that it is a night the devil has made a point of claiming for himself.

“No it’s not!” snarled a hidden voice. “It’s Jason’s night!” A boy who was taller than the rest stepped out from the shadows. He was wearing the white hockey mask of “Jason,” the demented, ghoulish killer in the movie Friday the 13th and was brandishing a very realistic-looking hatchet. I have to admit that the boy gave me a start, but I stood my ground and dropped a banana into his bag.

“No, ‘Jason,’ this is still Jesus’ night!” I repeated. And indeed it is, even though it is most assuredly the night set aside for the glorification and worship of idols, false gods, Satan, and death. “For this purpose the Son of God was manifested, that He might destroy the works of the devil.”1

“Jason” evidently resented the competition, however, for he ripped our mailbox right out of the ground and left his banana squished on the stair.


Most of us in the United States have grown up observing Halloween in one form or another. From the time we are in preschool, we make drawings or cutouts of sinister black Witches—the haggier the better. We make paintings of gruesome black cats with gleaming, evil, orange eyes; we hang up smirking paper skeletons with dancing limbs; we glue together ghost and bat mobiles; and we design demoniacal faces for our pumpkins.

For several years, one thoughtful kindergarten teacher in Southern California even provided ghosts for her pupils to commune with at Halloween. I spoke with one of the mothers from that school who told me that her little boy was sent home with a note from the teacher informing the parents that their child would be bringing home a “special friend” the next day. The child was to nurture his “friend,” name it, feed it, and talk to it—all as a part of a special class project that was designed to “develop the child’s imagination.”

The next day, the little boy came home with a sealed envelope along with explicit instructions that his parents were not to touch it; only the child was allowed to open the envelope. Mom said, “You bet!” and promptly opened it up. Inside was six inches of thick orange wool string with a knot tied a quarter of the way up to make a loop resembling a head. The mimeographed “letter” that accompanied it read as follows:

Haunted House
001 Cemetery Lane

Dear Customer,

Thank you for your order. Your ghost is exactly what you ordered. You will find that your ghost is attached to an orange string. Do not untie the special knot until you are ready to let your ghost go.

Your ghost will tell you when it is hungry and what it prefers to eat. It will sleep in the air beside you all day. It especially likes quiet places where there are cobwebs, creaky boards and corners.

If you follow the above directions, you will have a very happy ghost.

Yours truly,

Head Ghost

The mother, a Christian, didn’t approve of the idea of her son taking in a pet ghost, however housebroken. She was also a little suspicious of her six-year-old being addressed as “Dear Customer.” So she confiscated the thing and put it in the garage on a shelf until she could decide what to do with it. The next day, her sister was in the garage on an errand, unaware of the matter of the “ghost in the string.” Suddenly she was frightened by the sense of a threatening presence around her. She heard the sounds of a cat hissing in the corner and something like a “chatty doll” mumbling incoherently at her. Later that night they threw the “ghost string” into the garbage pail, prayed to bind and remove the entity, and were never bothered by the “presence” again. This family had no trouble whatever believing that a spirit had indeed been sent home with their little boy and that it didn’t much like having been assigned to a Christian household.2

The Halloween ghosts were given out again the following year by the same teacher. The Christian mother managed to get hold of the envelope, orange ghost-carrier and all, and sent it to me. It is possible, of course, that the teacher meant nothing sinister by it. Perhaps to her it was just a cute exercise in imagination for her kindergartners. Nevertheless, in light of the stated intent of many Transpersonal (i.e., a branch of psychology that focuses on mysticism and the occult in the search for transcendence) educators to introduce children to spirit guides, I can’t help but be a little curious about any teacher who sends the children home with “imaginary friends.”


Even in the church, Halloween is a time of spooky fun and games. Any number of evangelical churches, ever mindful of their youth programs and ministries, will sponsor haunted houses designed to scare the wits out of the kids. From 1970 to 2001 in Bakersfield, California, Youth for Christ’s Campus Life was a co-sponsor of “Scream in the Dark,” an event that was held every night for about a week before Halloween. At least 20,000 people “brave[d] the chilly corridors and dark passages” every year to face ghoulish figures, terrifying tunnels, and screams in the dark.3

While many churches have switched from Halloween activities to alternative events on Halloween such as Harvest parties, countless Christians still allow their children to celebrate Halloween with door-to-door trick or treating and dressing up in scary costumes. Christian actor Kirk Cameron (Left Behind films and Fireproof) has come out publicly defending Halloween. In an interview in a popular online Christian magazine, Cameron stated that Christians “should have the biggest Halloween party on your block.” Cameron said he had no problem with Christians dressing up in devil, ghost, and other traditional Halloween costumes because they could do it as a way to witness to unbelievers.4

But is this church-sponsored horror a good idea? There are a number of reasons it is not. For one thing, terror can kill. When my husband was a teenager, the family next door to him lost their toddler one Halloween when the little one opened the door to trick-or-treaters. Their hideous appearance and shrieks so traumatized the child that he literally dropped dead on the spot. That may be a rare example, but the fact remains that terrorizing children is dangerous.

Church-sponsored horror isn’t a new phenomenon. My husband’s Lutheran church in New York always sponsored a “Chamber of Horrors” when he was a boy, complete with fluorescent skeletons, scary pop-ups, peeled grapes to simulate dead eyeballs, and a bowl of cold spaghetti that was supposed to be . . . well, you know. Anyway, they made you stick your hand into it, and any number of kids spent the rest of the night throwing up.

Halloween has become a full-fledged national children’s play day, but for hundreds of thousands of people in the Western world (and their numbers are growing steadily) Halloween is a sacred time, the ancient pagan festival of fire and death.


The origins and traditions of Halloween can be traced back thousands of years to the days of the ancient Celts and their priests, the Druids. The eve of October 31 marked the transition from summer into the darkness of winter. It marked the beginning of the Celtic New Year. The Feast of Samhain was a fearsome night, a dreaded night, a night in which great bonfires were lit, according to some pagan traditions, to Samana the Lord of Death, the dark Aryan god who was known as the Grim Reaper, the leader of the ancestral ghosts.5

On this night, the spirits of the dead rose up, shivering with the coming cold of winter and seeking the warmth and affection of the homes they once inhabited. And even colder, darker creatures filled the night: evil Witches flying through the night,6 hobgoblins, and evil pookas that appeared in the form of hideous black horses. Demons, fairies, and ghouls roamed about as the doors of the burial sidh-mounds opened wide,7 allowing them free access to the world of living men. These loathsome beings were usually not in a particularly good mood by the time they arrived, and it was feared that unless these spirits were appeased and soothed with offerings and gifts they would wreak mischief and vengeance by destroying crops, killing cattle, turning milk sour, and generally making life miserable.

So it was that families offered what was most precious to them: food—a “treat” which they fervently hoped would be sufficient to offset any “trick” which the ghostly blackmailers might otherwise be tempted to inflict.

The ancient Celtic villagers realized, however, that merely feeding the spirits might not be enough to speed them on their way. The ghoulies might decide it would be rude to eat and run, as it were, and might just be tempted to stick around.

That simply would not do. So arose the practice of dressing in masks and costumes: Chosen villagers disguised themselves as the fell creatures at large, mystically taking on their attributes and powers. The “mummers,” as they were called, cavorted from house to house collecting the ancient Celtic equivalent of protection money, and then romped the ghosts right out of town when they were through.

They carried jack-o’-lanterns to light their way—turnips or potatoes with fearful, demonic faces carved into them which they hoped would duly impress, if not intimidate, the demons around them.8


As a part of their ancient New Year’s ritual, massive sacred bonfires were lit throughout the countryside of Wales, Ireland, and France—fires from which every house in the village would rekindle their hearth fires (which had been ritually extinguished, as they were at the end of every year). The villagers would gather and dance round and round the bonfire, whose light and heat they believed would help the sun make it through the cold, dark winter.9

But the great fires served another purpose as well: On this night, unspeakable sacrifices were offered by the Druid priests to the Lord of Death. Lewis Spence in his book The History and Origins of Druidism says:

Certain writers on Celtic history have indignantly denied that the Druidic caste ever practiced the horrible rite of human sacrifice. There is no question, however, that practice it they did. Tacitus alludes to the fact that the Druids of Anglesea “covered their altars with the blood of captives.” If the words of Caesar are to be credited, human sacrifice was a frequent and common element in their religious procedure. He tells us that no sacrifice might be carried out except in the presence of a Druid.10

It is in his Commentaries that Caesar speaks of the great wicker images “in which the Druids were said to burn scores of people alive.”11

Some modem Witches may still deny that the Druidic religion, on which many of their beliefs and practices are based, ever practiced human and animal sacrifice as a part of their “peaceable nature religion.” But some noted Witches have indeed acknowledged the murderous bent of the ancient religion:

Propitiation, in the old days when survival was felt to depend on it, was a grim and serious affair. There can be little doubt that at one time it involved human sacrifice—of criminals saved up for the purpose or, at the other end of the scale, of an aging king; little doubt, either, that these ritual deaths were by fire.12

The Druids (from the Gaelic word druidh, meaning “a wise man” or “magician”13) would carefully watch the writhing of the victims in the fire (whether people or animals) and from their death agonies would foretell the future of the village. The Feast of Samhain was by no means the only celebration at which the Druids practiced human sacrifice. Sacrificial victims were also burned in their sacred fires during the spring festival of Beltane held on the eve of the first of May as part of their fertility rites.14 So it would seem, according to ancient historians, that human and animal sacrifice was a particularly noxious and pervasive habit among the Druids.

The Farrars, well-known authors and practicing Witches in Ireland, tell us that “Later, of course, the propitiatory sacrifice became symbolic . . .” but then mention that the royal sacrifice at Samhain may have lingered in the form of animal substitutes. The Farrars tell us of at least one animal sacrifice they knew of that took place in their village “within living memory.”15 We can only hope that “the old days when survival was felt to depend on human sacrifice” will never return.


One Halloween several years ago, I watched a rerun of Garfield’s Halloween Adventure. Garfield was thrilled at the realization that Halloween was a night where he got to rake in free candy. “This is the night I was created for,” he exclaimed with as much enthusiasm as Garfield ever seems to muster.

He decides to sucker poor unsuspecting Otie, an exceedingly dumb (though endearing) doggie, into going with him so that Garfield could double his personal candy haul. Well . . . maybe he’ll give Otie one piece of candy for his troubles.

Then suddenly Garfield pauses in his Machiavellian musings and wonders, “Am I being too greedy? Should I share my candy with those less fortunate than I? Am I missing the spirit of Halloween?” Wouldn’t it be nice if that were in fact the spirit of Halloween! But nothing could be further from the truth.

The “spirit of Halloween” is more accurately discerned in the horror movies and DVDs traditionally released in honor of the season.16 Popular cinematic “treasures” like Halloween (and its three sequels), Friday the 13th (three of those), Halloweennight, Tale of Halloween, and any number of slasher, blood-and-gore, murder- and-terror flicks are truer to the original “spirit of Halloween”—the spirit of sudden death and murder—than is the sight of little Linus sitting all night in his “sincere” pumpkin patch waiting for the Great Pumpkin, or of Garfield in his relentless quest for candy.


Modern Witches would vehemently deny that their celebration has anything to do with the demonic horrors depicted in such films as Friday the 13th. To them, Halloween is one of the four greater Sabbats held during the year. It is the time of Harvest Celebration—that season in which the Great Goddess goes to sleep for the long winter months, giving way to the Horned God of Hunting and Death, who will rule until her return on the first of May. It is a time of ritual and for ridding oneself of personal weaknesses,17 a time for feasting and joyful celebration. It is also a time for communing with the spirits of the dead.

Witches Arnold and Patricia Crowther say that—

Halloween has always been the Festival of the Dead and was believed to be the best time to contact those who had passed over. Today, spiritualists try to contact the departed by means of “spirit guides”—American Indians, Chinese men, nuns, priests and even little girls. Witches tried to make contact through the god of Death himself. So when the bonfire had burned down, the priestess, in her new role as the god, held a skull between her hands, using it as a crystal-gazing ball. This was the kind of necromancy practiced centuries before the Fox Sisters, with their poltergeist tappings, started the modern craze for spiritualism.18

The Celts, say the Crowthers, would sometimes lie on graves during Halloween, hoping to hear some word of wisdom from the spirits of the corpses beneath them. And the Crowthers boast that “the high priestesses were just as successful in contacting the dead as are our own mediums.”19 According to a longtime Witch with whom I once spoke, they still are. Communing with the spirits of the dead is a regular feature of their covens’ Halloween rituals.

Several years ago, an article in the Los Angeles Times featured a story on a certain coven’s celebration rituals during Halloween. The story described the ritual and then told that it “will be repeated throughout the Southland today as Witches celebrate their most important holiday, Samhain, or Halloween, when they believe the veil between the worlds becomes thin, making visits with spirits possible.” Some Witches will use the Ouija board to contact the dead. Others will use a darkened scrying-mirror into which they stare until the faces of their beloved departed supposedly appear. Others may use a crystal ball or “sit quietly round the cauldron, gazing into the incense smoke, talking of what they see and feel.”20


While the Witches are spending the Halloween season tucking in their Goddess for her long winter sleep and frolicking in joyful communion with the spirits of the dead, there is another religious group that is equally serious about its Halloween celebrations: the Satanists. Halloween to them is a more sinister and direct celebration of death and Satan. Unlike the Witches, of whom most do not even acknowledge the existence of Satan, the Satanists are quite candid about exactly who the dread “lord of death” happens to be, and they celebrate Halloween as one of his two highest unholy days.

As is the case among the Witches, different “denominations” of Satanists have their own peculiar traditions, beliefs, and practices on this night. For some of them Satan is not a real, specific entity but rather the personification of evil resident within all men, a “dark hidden force in nature responsible for the workings of earthly affairs.”21

Other Satanists however—cult Satanists—understand that Satan is very real indeed. To them, the sacrifices he demands are not symbolic at all.22 They believe that the blood sacrifice of innocence which Satan demands as the ultimate blasphemy and sign of devotion to himself must be very literal indeed. At various times during the year, but especially during the month of October, police across the country report finding the remains of animals—some with the blood drained, others with various organs missing, some carefully skinned while keeping the tortured creature alive. They are frequently found at sites which indicate that some form of ritual took place. When no altar or pentagram or other symbolism is in evidence, it is entirely likely that some neophyte or self-styled Satanist is simply practicing to make sure the “sacrifice” is letter-perfect for the ceremony.

Because of its innocence and frailty, a tiny child is viewed by these Satanists as the perfect sacrifice to their Master. The infant is seen as a representation of the Christ Child, and it is He whom they are blaspheming and symbolically destroying in the prolonged and brutal torture and slaying of the child. After the death of the baby, the members will all eat a portion of the little one’s heart and will drink its blood.


Halloween is also a prime recruiting season for the Satanists. Much as the government will plant undercover narcotic agents in various high schools to find out who is pushing or using drugs on campus, so some Satanists may plant kids at the schools who are there solely for the purpose of discerning potential members or victims among the students. The Dungeons and Dragons clubs are key hunting grounds for them, as are other groups and clubs based on medieval themes.

Church-sponsored “haunted houses” are also fertile recruiting centers. The Satanists watch for those kids who show a marked bent for the macabre and the sinister, and they invite them to a “real good” party being held elsewhere, which proves to be a lower-level ritual held for the purpose of initiating these kids into Satanism.


So . . . should your family participate in the traditional Halloween celebrations? Absolutely . . . if you and/or your children are Witches, Satanists, humanists, atheists, pagans, or anything other than born-again Christians (or Orthodox Jews). For a true Christian to participate in the ancient trappings of Halloween is as incongruous as for a committed cult Satanist coming from a blood sacrifice on Christmas Eve to set up a crèche in his living room and sing “Silent Night, Holy Night” with heartfelt, sincere devotion to baby Jesus.

Ephesians 5:1 admonishes us to be imitators of God. Can you picture the Lord Jesus dressing up as Satan, or as one of the demons He cast out that week, or perhaps as a Druid priest, just because it was the Feast of Samhain and His disciples were giving a nifty party that night in honor of the tradition? Or can you see the apostles disguising themselves as temple prostitutes or as worshipers of the god Moloch, to whom the Canaanites (and even the Israelites in their darker days) sacrificed their children?23

Halloween is a day in which virtually every occult practice that God has called “abomination” is glorified.

When you come into the land which the Lord your God is giving you, you shall not learn to follow the abominations of those nations. There shall not be found among you anyone who makes his son or his daughter pass through the fire, or one who practices witchcraft, or a soothsayer, or one who interprets omens, or a sorcerer, or one who conjures spells, or a medium, or a spiritist, or one who calls up the dead.  For all who do these things are an abomination to the Lord, and because of these abominations the Lord your God drives them out from before you. You shall be blameless before the Lord your God. For these nations which you will dispossess listened to soothsayers and diviners; but as for you, the Lord your God has not appointed such for you. (Deuteronomy 18:9-14, NASB*)

“But it’s only for one night!” some cry. “It’s only in fun for the children!” If this is how you feel, then you need to understand what the Word of God says to you:

Learn not the way of the heathen! (Jeremiah 10:2)

Be ye not unequally yoked together with unbelievers: for what fellowship hath righteousness with unrighteousness? and what communion hath light with darkness? and what concord hath Christ with Belial? or what part hath he that believeth with an infidel? and what agreement hath the temple of God with idols? for ye are the temple of the living God; as God hath said, I will dwell in them, and walk in them; and I will be their God, and they shall be my people. Wherefore come out from among them, and be ye separate, saith the Lord, and touch not the unclean thing; and I will receive you. (2 Corinthians 6:14-17)

But I say, that the things which the Gentiles sacrifice, they sacrifice to devils, and not to God: and I would not that ye should have fellowship with devils. Ye cannot drink the cup of the Lord, and the cup of devils: ye cannot be partakers of the Lord’s table, and of the table of devils. (1 Corinthians 10:20-21)


There are any number of creative alternatives that can be provided for children on Halloween without participating in the ancient religious traditions of the Witches and Satanists.

Some families view the occasion as a witnessing opportunity and handout Gospel tracts along with the treats. Some churches are now sponsoring “Bible Houses,” in which the kids go through and hear different Bible stories read or acted out—a godly alternative to the haunted-house routine!

Other Christian families choose to spend the night remembering the saints who have gone to be with the Lord during the year. Saints aren’t just those who have been canonized as such by some church. A saint, according to the Bible, is anyone who has believed in the Lord Jesus Christ as his personal Messiah. Perhaps you could spend this night talking about the martyrs who were willing to die rather than compromise their belief in the Lord Jesus Christ.

Christian parents can also make a difference in the way the schools their children attend celebrate Halloween. In Colorado, parents protested the traditional celebration of Halloween in several public schools, including at least one elementary school on the grounds that it is a “high holy day in the satanic religion, and as such is an inappropriate holiday for schoolchildren.”24 One mother said that she “would like to see the same measures applied to the Halloween parties as have been taken with the Christmas parties.”25 In light of the present distress, I fully agree. Since God and Jesus have been banned from Christmas, Easter, and Thanksgiving celebrations in most of our schools, why should the government-recognized religions of Witchcraft and Satanism get free promotion on Halloween from these same institutions?

One thing Halloween should not be for the Christian is a time of fear. It should be a time to rejoice in the fact that “For this purpose the Son of God was manifested, that he might destroy the works of the devil” (1 John 3:8)! Spend at least part of this night worshiping God by singing hymns. Above all, spend time in prayer and intercession for the children.

It is tragic that many people in the church have forgotten that “God hath not given us the spirit of fear; but of power and of love and of a sound mind” (2 Timothy 1:7), and that includes on Halloween! Too many of our children have been made vulnerable to a spirit of fear and to the occult where we allow faith in God to be extinguished by participating in the darkness of this world.

After the repeal of the Witchcraft Act in England in 1951, the Witches and Satanists experienced a revival which is currently in full swing. You might not know too much about Witches or Satanists, but I guarantee you that most kids do in today’s computerized, Internet, social-media world.

For ye were sometimes [formerly] darkness, but now are ye light in the Lord: walk as children of light . . . And have no fellowship with the unfruitful works of darkness, but rather reprove [expose] them. (Ephesians 5:8,11)

To order copies of HALLOWEEN! A Warning to Christian Parents, click here. 

1. 1 John 3:8.
2. Back in 1985, there was an outfit that called itself “Adopt-a-Ghost” based in Hollywood, California. For a paltry $10.00 to cover adoption papers and conjuring fees, you could adopt a ghost for your house, condo, apartment, or office . . . like a Cabbage Patch Kid, only cheaper and considerably livelier. Hauntings were guaranteed, and the ghost even came with written tips on ghost-raising to make sure it would stick around.
3. Connie Swart, “Event Still a Scream,” the Bakersfield Californian, October 16,1982, p. 13.
4. Emma Koonse, “Kirk Cameron on Halloween: ‘Christians Should Have the Biggest Party on the Block’” (Christian Post, October 20, 2014,
5. Barbara G. Walker, The Woman’s Encyclopedia of Myths and Secrets (San Francisco, CA: Harper and Row Publishers, 1983), p. 372.
6. Encyclopedia of Witchcraft and Demonology (London: Octopus Books Ltd., 1974), p. 166. Introduction by Hans Holzer.
7. Janet and Stewart Farrar, A Witches Bible, vol.1, The Sabbats (New York, NY: Magickal Childe Publishing, Inc., 1981, 1984), p. 122.
8. The lantern was also called a “corpse lantern” or”fairie fire,” or a will-o’-the-wisp, and numerous fascinating legends about its origins have risen up around it. Some thought it was the spirit of a child which had been buried in the swamp. Others thought it represented the lights fairies used to beckon fools to watery death in the swamps. Another legend tells of a clever fellow named Jack who got himself barred from hell as well as heaven for being something of a Faustian smart aleck and was doomed to run about earth for all eternity with the burning coal he snatched from hell itself with the turnip he was eating just before the gates slammed shut. This story makes little sense to me at all. I mean, would you be eating a turnip while standing at the gates of hell politely requesting admittance? Doubtful. One version of this tale found in an elementary school teacher’s “Halloween Fun” manual observes that the devil threw the burning coal at Jack to drive him away and that Jack caught the thing in his turnip. This makes more sense. Anyway, the Celts carved jack’o’lanterns out of turnips, nonetheless. They probably used turnips because they didn’t have pumpkins. They had to come to America to discover them, which they did during the mass immigration to America during the great potato famine of 1886. They soon realized that pumpkins are a whole lot easier to carve than turnips. They also make nicer pies.
St. James Church in the Los Angeles area held a “Pumpkin Mass” in 1987 in which the priest blessed the parishioners’ Halloween costumes (to be brought in boxes or sacks) and the pumpkins which were to be carved and placed in the sanctuary. The verse quoted for the occasion: “Ye are the light of the world. . . . Let your light so shine before men” (Matthew 5:14, 16).
9. Encyclopedia of Witchcraft, p.166.
10. Lewis Spence, The History of Origins of Druidism (Great Britain: EP Publishing Ltd., 1976), p. 104.
11. Ibid.
12. Farrar and Farrar, A Witches Bible, vol. 1 The Sabbats, op. cit., p. 122.
13. Raymond Buckland, Witchcraft from the Inside (St. Paul, MN: Llewellyn Publications, 1975), p. 16.
14. Lewis Spence, The History of Origins, op. cit., p. 105.
15. Farrar and Farrar, A Witches Bible, vol. 1, The Sabbats, op. cit., p. 122.
16. James Frazer records in The Golden Bough (New York, NY: Macmillan Publishing Co., Inc., 1922) that in some areas “people who assisted at the bonfires would wait till the last spark was out and then would suddenly take to their heels, shouting at the top of their voices, “The cropped black sow seize the hindmost!” The saying implies that originally one of the company became a victim in dead earnest” (The Golden Bough, p. 736). The “cropped black sow” was a representation of the Goddess Cerridwen in her dark aspect as the Crone, according to Welsh mythology (A Witches Bible, vol.1, The Sabbats, p. 125). She is still worshiped in that aspect by Wiccans today, as well as in her more appealing forms of Maiden and Mother.
As the Farrars point out in A Witches Bible, vol. 1, The Sabbats, p. 725), “All these victim-choosing rituals long ago mellowed into a mere romp, but Frazer had no doubt of their original grim purpose. What was once a deadly serious ritual at the great tribal fire had become a party game at the family ones.” They may have “mellowed in time,” in most places, but nevertheless, it was the terror of the original sacrifices and demons that most accurately represents the “true spirit” of Halloween. The true “spirit of Halloween” is that of sudden death and murder.
17. Raymond Buckland, Buckland’s Complete Book of Witchcraft (St. Paul, MN: Llewellyn Publications, 1986), p. 68.
18. Arnold and Patricia Crowther, The Secrets of Ancient Witchcraft with the Witches Tarot (West Caldwell, NJ: University Books, Inc., 1974), pp. 67-68.
19. Ibid., p. 68.
20. Farrar and Farrar, A Witches Bible, vol 1, The Sabbats, op. cit., p. 135.
21. Anton Szandor LaVey, The Satanic Bible (New York, NY: Avon Books, 1969), p. v of introduction.
22. Anton LaVey clarifies his position on human sacrifice on page 88 of his Satanic Bible, in which he says: “Symbolically, the victim is destroyed through the working of a hex or curse, which in turn leads to the physical, mental or emotional destruction of the ‘sacrifice’ in ways and means not attributable to the magician. The only time a Satanist would perform a human sacrifice would be if it were to serve a two-fold purpose; that being to release the magician’s wrath in the throwing of a curse, and more important, to dispose of a totally obnoxious and deserving individual.”
23. Ezekiel 16:20,21; Jeremiah 32:35; 2 Kings 17:17; Isaiah 57:5.
24 Rebecca Jones, “Halloween Parade Off” (The Eagle Forum, vol.8, no.4, Fall 1982), p. 17.
25. Ibid.

*Scripture verses in this booklet are taken from the King James Bible, except on page 14 where one verse is taken from the NASB. Scripture taken from the New American Stanard Bible(R), Copyright (C) 1960, 1962,1963,1968,1971,1972,1973,1975, 1977,1995 by The Lockman Foundation. Used by permission.

To order copies of HALLOWEEN! A Warning to Christian Parents, click here. 

About the Author

Johanna Michaelsen is a noted author, lecturer, and authority on the occult. Her internationally best-selling autobiography, The Beautiful Side of Evil, tells the story of her involvement with the occult, Yoga, Silva Mind Control, a well-known psychic surgeon in Mexico City, and her eventual rejections of all such practices. Published by Harvest House in 1982, it has been translated into German, Dutch, French, Indonesian, Bulgarian, Polish, Chinese, Portuguese, Korean, and Spanish.

Her second book Like Lambs to the Slaughter: Your Child and the Occult (available through Amazon), also a best seller, clearly and extensively documents the invasion of occultism and dangerous religious practices into America’s public education system, movies, television, books, games, holidays, and more.

Since Johanna Michaelsen’s exit from the occult in November of 1972, she has devoted her time to studying current trends and occult practices for the purpose of warning and equipping the church in these last days. Her books, tapes, audio-book, seminars, and lectures have helped thousands find freedom and peace in Jesus Christ.

Johanna is available for interviews and seminars and can be reached at You may visit her on the web at:

Share This!
Share On Twitter
Share On Pinterest
Share On Youtube
Contact us

Woman Who Was Supposed to Die: ‘The only reason I am alive is the fact that the abortionist had not yet arrived at work.’

photo credit: youtube

photo credit: youtube

By Lindsey Bever
Washington Post

Twelve months ago, Gianna Jessen testified against Planned Parenthood, saying during a congressional hearing that her biological mother was seven and a half months pregnant when she was advised to undergo an abortion by saline — which “burns the baby inside and out, blinding and suffocating the child, who is then born dead, usually within 24 hours.”

“Instead of dying,” Jessen said on Capitol Hill, “after 18 hours of being burned in my mother’s womb, I was delivered alive in an abortion clinic in Los Angeles on April the 6th, 1977.”

“Doctors,” she said, “did not expect me to live.” Click here to continue reading.

Share This!
Share On Twitter
Share On Pinterest
Share On Youtube
Contact us

Lighthouse Trails RSS Feed

October 2016
« Sep    
Show Buttons
Share On Facebook
Share On Twitter
Share On Google Plus
Share On Pinterest
Share On Youtube
Contact us
Hide Buttons