Archive for the ‘Reiki/Energy Healing’ Category

Update on Ray Yungen

We want to thank our readers who have been praying for Ray Yungen during his 7-day cancer treatment in the hospital, which we wrote to you about last week. He is finishing that treatment up today and will be released by tomorrow morning. During the treatment, Ray’s white blood count plummeted, and he had to have three blood transfusions. But overall, he did well with the treatment. And with the 98% success rate for people with this kind of leukemia and with so many people praying for him, we are looking forward to seeing Ray’s health greatly improve over the next few weeks and months. Ray is 64 years young and has a lot of motivation to continue on with his ministry for some time to come.

While Ray was in the hospital, he had something happen that has raised that motivation even higher. Here is a synopsis of what happened by a Lighthouse Trails reader who was visiting Ray this past weekend. We think you will understand why it affected him greatly:

Ray Yungen

Ray Yungen

Dear Lighthouse Trails:

I saw Ray yesterday.  He is still managing the chemo well but having difficulty sleeping at night.  No nausea, just sleep deprivation is making him feel a little off.

Shortly after I left yesterday, he called, quite distraught that a woman volunteer had walked into his room and offered to do Reiki on him.  It shook him up considerably.  In his words, “she might as well have been coming at me with a machete.”  Adding to that, when he realized that this woman was free to move about the hospital and offer Reiki to the unsuspecting and vulnerable, it brought him to tears. By contrast, he noted, if someone else was to ask to go room to room and offer to pray with patients, that would not be allowed.  Reiki is no less spiritual, but because it is seen as only therapeutic and not the dangerous spiritual practice that it is . . . it marches in, uncontested. It took him back because he assumed that it might be a “service” that a patient could request, but he was not prepared to have her march right into his room unannounced.  On Tuesday, he hopes to be more prepared to have a conversation with the main organizer.  They show up 2 or 3 times a week. Please pray for him as he is given this opportunity.

By the way, I work in the office of a Christian school.  As I was going through the catalogs that come our way, on the ACSI catalog  (Assoc. of Christian Schools Intl.) in a bold title across the top read “Spiritual Formation.”  I took it to Ray yesterday, and he read it cover to cover and is dismayed that it has reached the elementary schools.  Of course, old news at seminaries, colleges, churches, but now the elementary Christian schools. He acknowledged it is the subject of an upcoming booklet.

___________

Related Information:

Yungen Interview – 2 Million Reiki Channellers in the US Alone! – Millions of Americans Affected

BOOKLET: The Truth About Energy Healing

Association of Christian Schools International (ACSI) Sticks With Contemplative After All

IMPORTANT ALERT: Christian Homeschoolers Targeted by “Christ-Centered Energy Healing” Organization

“Are you looking for reliable, Christ-centered information and healing that is safe, affordable and that really does work? Are you sick & tired of being sick & tired? Are you a healer or are you searching for effective healing that is Christ-centered? You have found your tribe.”

So says Tammy Anderson Ward, President of Hope Haven Events, who presents the “Christ-Centered Energy Healing Conferences.” If Christ-centered energy healing sounds like an oxymoron, that’s because it is. And all one needs to do is cruise around on the  website to see that the nature of these conferences is blatantly New Age. But we’ll get to that in a little bit. The group is reaching out to a broad audience and is being billed as “the world’s largest Christ-centered energy healing conference;” but what caught the attention of Lighthouse Trails and author Ray Yungen more than anything is that they are reaching out to homeschool kids and parents, a traditionally conservative segment of the population.

It’s understandable that Tammy Anderson Ward is trying to reach homeschool families, she is a homeschool mom who has eight children, and we don’t doubt that she loves her children very much and seems to be a person of good will. But when you hear what these events are promoting, we think you will agree that this should NOT be called “Christ Centered.”

In the video below, Tammy Anderson Ward explains how her family got involved with energy healing.

What is energy healing? For those of you reading this who have been reading material from Lighthouse Trails for some time, you know that energy healing is supernatural in nature and is generally connected with an occultic worldview. In Ray Yungen’s booklet titled The Truth About Energy Healing, he explains how energy healing is tied in with the chakras, which are said to be “energy centers” or “spinning balls of psychic energy.” The chakras are the basis for energy healing. The energy healer places his or her hands on or over (touch is not necessary) the patient, and this energy is transferred from the practitioner to the patient. It is believed by energy healers that the chi energy connects everything together. This may sound like science fiction or something completely surreal, but after years of study and research, Ray Yungen has come to the conclusion that this transferred energy is demonic because of the underlying belief  that God is in all things and man is divine. There are many theologians in the church who would agree with his assessment.

bigstockphoto.com

bigstockphoto.com

Evangelical Christianity has always presented healing in a religious sense (i.e., we pray to God and ask Him to heal with His power, not a power within ourselves that we learn to manipulate and utilize). New Age healing is always presented in a therapeutic context. In other words, it’s something you tap into or learn to do (which explains the need for conferences – you have to go there and learn to do it). Some may be thinking right now that perhaps Tammy Anderson Ward is merely calling her techniques energy healing but does not bring chakras into the picture. A study of speakers she invites to her conferences throws that assumption out the window. On the Christ Centered Energy Healing store site, there is a section selling products from past conferences. Here are some of the titles: Chakras and the Armor of God, Chakras: Know Your Energy Centers, The Spirit of the Chakras, Are Chi and Chakras for Christians? (no doubt, this speaker says yes), and Energy Healing: Dance to Heal Your Chakras. If you feel like you have just been read a list of New Age titles, we hope this news article we are writing will deeply concern you.

From Christ Centered Energy Healing website; used in accordance with the US Fair Use Act for the purpose of critique and review

This past March, Hope Haven held a “Christ Centered Energy Healing” conference in Mesa, Arizona. Some of the seminars that were offered were: Creating Health: The New Era, Healing Games to Play With Your Children, Crystal Connections: Another of Heaven’s Tools, Group Energy Healing, The Peace & Power of BE-ing Present, and Sailing into the 5th Dimension, Gracefully. By the way, the 5th dimension is referring to the altered state of consciousness reached during deep meditation. Sheena Davis, one of the presenters at March’s conference, taught a workshop called Healing Methods for everyone. The website describes the class:

In the following YouTube video, you can learn more about Reiki (one of the more popular forms of energy healing):

Vital Recommended Resources

 

 

 

Letter to the Editor: My Mother is Doing Reiki and Communicating with “Angels”!

Woman receiving Reiki treatment

Woman receiving Reiki treatment

LTRP Note: Please see our links below this letter for some excellent resources on Reiki.

Dear Lighthouse Trails:

I won’t bore you with details of my life and why I am writing, but want you to know I am a Bible-believing Christian. My mom is into the New Age movement and has had Reiki done on her for years; recently she started practicing Reiki.  She does it on friends and family members (I am the only Christian in the family).  I live with back pain, and she has wanted to do it on me.  I have always said no, but after researching Reiki I finally decided  to tell her that my beliefs conflict with Reiki and that the “energy” is actually demonic (that was a difficult conversation).  FYI, she told me she can’t do it on anyone without their permission.  Also she regularly meditates and talks to “her angel,” whom she credits with anything good happening.  She is getting deeper into this.

My mother says she prays to “Jesus” before doing Reiki.  When she said that, I knew I couldn’t keep ignoring it and decided I needed to really look into Reiki and share my faith (she knows I’m a Christian—thus telling me Reiki is OK for me because she prays to Jesus; but I don’t think she saw much distinction in our beliefs and said her Reiki teacher used to be a female minister).  She does not believe in the Bible or most of it anyway, nor Jesus’ deity, but rather He came to point the way to God.  To me, of course, this just doesn’t make any logical sense for so many reasons (I told her those reasons), but she is so deceived she can’t see reason.  This “Jesus” seems to be a big part of her life, but I think her angel(s) more so.  She states she only “prays” to God but “talks” to her angel(s) and asks them for help.  I see the contradiction because she “prays” to Jesus before Reiki but doesn’t believe He’s God yet only prays to God. But she doesn’t see it.  Obviously this is a false Jesus (and are not holy angels). We are very close, but it turns my stomach to hear her talk about her angels (one of whom is “like a best friend” and has a name).

I’ve been trying to research any author or speaker before I listen/read  them because I know how subtle wrong teaching can come in.  It takes a lot of discernment; your website will help me a lot.  So many people are being mislead by a lot of different things.  It’s heartbreaking! I don’t think my Christian friends truly understand what this stuff is so its hard for them to understand how upset I am.

Thank you so much!  I’m so glad you are telling the truth.  I felt impotent in my search for answers until I stumbled upon the podcasts and then the website.

C.S.

Related Information:

Markell/Yungen Interview – 2 Million Reiki Channellers in the US Alone! – Millions of Americans Affected

Energy Healing: Reiki, and Therapeutic Touch – Entertaining Devils Unaware

Excellent Video on Warning about Reiki by Shazoolo

 

Letter to the Editor: Not Willing to Compromise Beliefs for Relief Over Physical Pain

To Lighthouse Trails:

I hope you can help me. I am battling a number of health issues and find myself having to choose relief or compromise my beliefs. I’d rather be sick than join the mystic forces. I want to know if you have a book on the pitfalls of mysticism in health care.  I went in for a cranial-sacral massage and got a full dose of yoga breathing and the repeated admonition to “turn off my monkey brain.”  I always ask the massage therapist if she is trained in Reiki, but I never thought
to ask if they use Kundalini energy. Forewarned is forearmed.  I hope you can point me in the right direction.

Thanks so much for all you do for the remnant of Christ,

Kathy

Woman receiving Reiki treatment

Woman receiving Reiki treatment

Hi Kathy,

Thanks for your email. We don’t have a book just devoted to that, but in Ray Yungen’s book, For Many Shall Come in My Name, he has a chapter on the New Age in medicine where he discusses various energy healing techniques. He also talks about Kundalini in that book. You can also read his booklet on energy healing online. Chris Lawson, of Spiritual Research Network, also has some information on Reiki and other dangerous practices that you might find helpful: http://www.spiritual-research-network.com/dangers_of_reiki.html. You’re doing the right thing, asking questions before allowing a practitioner to touch you. It’s very difficult today because even many “Christian” therapists are using Reiki and other energy healing methods. If they knew the occultic nature behind these practices, they would be shocked that they have done this to their patients.

Letter to the Editor: A Church I Visited Doing “Soaking” – What is Soaking?

Photo from CBN; used in accordance with the US Fair Use Act

Dear Lighthouse Trails:

A church I visited when I moved to another State has what they refer to as ‘soakings’. My understanding is that they sit quietly and wait for messages from the Lord. The pastor attends these soakings as well as participates in them. Sounds much like contemplative prayer to me. Several women in that church are tuned into ‘Jesus Calling’. It is an Assembly of God denomination. I have yet to see the term ‘soakings’ in your articles but I am relatively new and may have missed it?

Our Comment:

Lighthouse Trails has been collecting information on “soaking” prayer for a number of years. Here are some quotes about soaking prayer  by various authors. To read the entire articles, click on the links following the quotes.

SOAKING

There is nothing in the Bible about soaking or saturating in the Holy Spirit. We are to worship in Spirit and in truth (John 4:24), which means that the teaching in the Church must bring worship to the Lord by upholding the timeless truths of the written Word. – Sandy Simpson, “How to be Unsaturated”


Kundalini Energy & Christian Spirituality
(the same as contemplative or soaking prayer)
Ray Yungen
Kundalini is a Hindu term for the mystical power or force that underlies their spirituality. In Hinduism it is commonly referred to as the serpent power. Philip St. Romain, a substance abuse counselor and devout Catholic lay minister, began his journey while practicing contemplative prayer or resting in the still point, as he called it. What happened to him following this practice should bear the utmost scrutiny from the evangelical community-especially from our leadership. Having rejected mental prayer as “unproductive” he embraced the prayer form that switches off the mind, creating what he described as a mental passivity. What he encountered next underscores my concern with sobering clarity. Read more …. Kundalini Energy and Christian Spirituality

 

Physical Symptoms and a Demonic Realm

Physical symptoms, which can include things like a tingling sensation, that occur during Soaking Prayer are similar to those experienced during the Kundalini experience, and both are dangerous and can take the practitioner into a demonic realm.

* * * * * * *

“Some of these phenomena are obvious: weeping, cries, exuberant and prolonged expressions of praise, shaking, trembling, calmness, bodily writhing and distortions, falling over (sometimes referred to as ‘being slain in the Spirit’), laughter and jumping. Other phenomena are more subtle: slight trembling, fluttering of the eyelids, faint perspiring, a sheen on the face, ripples on the skin, deep breathing…” Wimber also said that people sometimes experience a sense of heaviness or tiredness, weeping or drunkenness.” “SOAKING PRAYER” by Roger Harper 


BODILY SENSATIONS AND “SOAKING PRAYER”

Kent Philpott

“Some leaders get tingling in their hands, some have their hands get warm when healing is about to occur, some feel “power surges” going through their bodies. Some claim that they see a person’s “aura” when soaking a person in prayer. Soaking means pouring out lots of prayer over a person, often with laying on of hands and/or passing the hands over a person. It is reminiscent of what is called “Therapeutic Touch” [Reiki] practiced by new age and alternative medicine enthusiasts. People who believe in soaking prayer get the sense that power is passing through their bodies and actually helping to bring healing, comfort and love. And those who are soaking someone testify that they feel waves coming from the person or going toward the person being prayed for. Certainly something may be felt or experienced, however, is it the Holy Spirit?” TORONTO BLESSING: CHRISTIAN-BASED MAGIC? by Kent Philpott



Also these articles:

SOAKING? A spiritual discipline or Eastern mysticism?
by Kjos Ministries

Contemplative Prayer and the Evangelical Church
by Ray Yungen

Reiki, a Universal Energy Technique to Heal
by Mike Oppenheimer

What is really going on in the church?
By Mike Oppenheimer

To fully understand soaking prayer, it is necessary to understand contemplative prayer and its relation to the occult and Hinduism. Read A Time of Departing

Letter to the Editor: “I Received a Reiki Treatment Without Being Told it Was Happening!

Kundalini MeditationTo Lighthouse Trails:

I am writing to inform you of a deeply worrying experience I had.

After having chiropractic treatment for years, I decided to give osteopathy a try, as it seemed to be more gentle on the body. But at the end of the treatment, something strange happened. The practitioner held my head for about seven minutes or so. Up until this point, I figured it was all part of the therapy. But then I became concerned. I couldn’t work out what he was doing, as he was not massaging my neck nor did he seem to be applying any pressure. Then I heard him taking several deep breaths.

I am a Christian who has deeply researched into how New Age philosophy and occult practices are entering theology and the churches. I know about the dangers of meditation, yoga, spiritual formation, contemplative prayer, etc. But this threw me. Yes, I could have spoken up, but I had been taken by surprise and was somewhat confused. I just wasn’t sure what was going on. Then I began to pray to God for protection if anything weird was happening. Soon after this, he stopped.

My treatment had ended. When I got up, I felt incredibly relaxed, as if I was somehow medicated and floating. It felt wonderful. But I knew something wasn’t right. I asked him what he had done, and he was very evasive. Then I told him that I have studied into the New Age and want nothing to do with it or its healing practices. He mumbled that he was not interested in the New Age but that he could help heal my insomnia by applying traditional relaxation techniques to balance my energy centres.

When I walked out of his office, I noticed a small picture on the wall of his reception. It was the drawing of a person in the yoga position showing the seven chakras.

I told him I wouldn’t be back. I knew he had performed some kind of psychic healing on me, but it wasn’t until the bus ride home that it hit me – it must have been Reiki!

Clearly, this osteopath conducts this occult healing practice on all his patients without asking them or telling them. And I wonder how many others in the medical profession (modern or traditional) are secretly doing the same thing. I was furious. However, it has made me much wiser and more prepared in the future should this ever happen again.

But my deep concern is this. I have been a Christian for 31 years, but it is only in the last five years that I have learned about New Age concepts and how Christians are, in many cases, being unwittingly seduced by them. Christians who have had no experience [or understanding] with the New Age (such as myself, until fairly recently) are the most vulnerable, as it is, for them unchartered territory and not recognised for what it is. Had I had this experience prior to learning about the dangers of New Age spirituality saturating the Western World, I am sure I would have kept returning to this osteopath, thinking he was indeed helping me.

I don’t think osteopathy is the problem, rather it is practitioners, such as the one I had, who want to add new methods to their “science”, quite possibly in their genuine search to provide “better” healing.

Sometime back, I had read on your website about how Reiki is being introduced to patients in hospitals. Nevertheless, when it happened to me it took me completely by surprise.

I thank God for your ministry of discernment. I am now writing a letter warning this osteopath about the source and dangers of his psychic healing techniques. Maybe God can use my experience as a witness to him. I may even send him your website link.

Zoe from Sydney, Australia (name used with permission)

Related Information:
Markell/Yungen Interview – 2 Million Reiki Channellers in the US Alone! – Millions of Americans Affected

Energy Healing: Reiki, and Therapeutic Touch – Entertaining Devils Unaware

Letter to the Editor from a Registered Nurse: 2 Concerns – Reiki and the Healing Codes

Considering Reiki? Watch This Video First

How the New Age Has “Creeped” Into the Church

by Ray Yungen

If you have ever wondered why New Age authors and their teachings are creeping past many Christians, then maybe the definition of creeping might help. The term means: slowly advancing at a speed that is not really apparent until you look back over a long time period. For instance, creeping inflation is not noticed in the short term, but when one looks back over twenty to thirty years, it is shocking. A meal that cost two dollars in 1970 now may cost eight dollars—however, the increase moved so slowly that the impact was diminished.

This same kind of movement has happened within our society and has gradually become mainstream. What was once seen as flaky is normal today—even useful. This trend is impacting evangelical Christianity at only a slightly lesser degree than secular society. The reason for the slight variance is that many, perhaps most, Christians have not yet grasped, or come to terms with, the practical mystic approach that New Age proponents have already incorporated into the secular world, as well as Christendom.

A mystical pragmatism is growing particularly fast through various New Age healing techniques. One such procedure is called Reiki (pronounced ray-key), a Japanese word that translates to Universal Life Energy or God energy. It has also been referred to as the radiance technique. Reiki is an ancient Tibetan Buddhist healing system, rediscovered by a Japanese man in the 1800s, that only recently has come to the West.

The Reiki technique consists of placing the hands on the recipient and then activating the energy to flow through the practitioner and into the recipient. One practitioner describes the experience in the following way:

When doing it, I become a channel through which this force, this juice of the universe, comes pouring from my palms into the body of the person I am touching, sometimes lightly, almost imperceptibly, sometimes in famished sucking drafts. I get it even as I’m giving it. It surrounds the two of us, patient and practitioner.1

Woman receiving Reiki treatment

Woman receiving Reiki treatment

What is this “juice of the universe?” The answer is an important one, given by a renowned Reiki master who explains:

A Reiki attunement is an initiation into a sacred metaphysical order that has been present on earth for thousands of years . . . By becoming part of this group, you will also be receiving help from the Reiki guides and other spiritual beings who are also working toward these goals.2

While this is not widely advertised, Reiki practitioners depend on this “spirit guide” connection as an integral aspect of Reiki. In fact, it is the very foundation and energy behind Reiki. One Reiki master who has enrolled hundreds of other masters spoke of her interaction with the spirit guides:

For  me, the Reiki guides make themselves the most felt while attunements are being passed. They stand behind me and direct the whole process, and I assume they also do this for every Reiki Master. When I pass attunements, I feel their presence strongly and constantly. Sometimes I can see them.3

A Christian’s initial response to this information might be, “So what? I don’t travel in those circles, so it does not concern me.” This nonchalant viewpoint would be valid except for the fact that Reiki is currently growing to enormous proportions and in some very influential circles. (It may even be in your local hospitals, schools, and youth organizations.) It is essential to know that many nurses, counselors, and especially massage therapists use Reiki as a supplement to their work. It is often promoted as a complementary service.

Even more significant are the numbers involved in this practice. Examine the following figures to catch just a glimpse of the growing popularity of Reiki. In 1998, there were approximately 33,000 Reiki listings on the Internet. Today that number, on some search engines, constitutes over 22,000,000 listings. In just ten years, that number has increased almost 700 fold! As I said in the first chapter of this book, there are now over one million Reiki practitioners in the U.S. One Reiki master delightfully noted this surge of interest when he stated:

Over the years, there has been a shift in the belief system of the general public, allowing for greater acceptance of alternative medicine. As a result, we are seeing a growing interest in Reiki from the public at large. People from all backgrounds are coming for treatments and taking classes.4

One very revealing statistic involves Louisville, Kentucky, where 102 people were initiated into Reiki in just a single weekend.5 This denotes a large number of people are drawn to Reiki in the Bible belt, traditionally a conservative part of America.

It is important to understand the way in which Reiki is presented to the public at large. Despite its underlying metaphysical foundation, when one reads the literature put out by Reiki practitioners it is not at all apparent. One Reiki master who runs a day spa repeatedly uses words like comfort and nurture in her brochure. Reiki is something that will give you pleasure. Another woman who is a professional counselor tells her potential clients that Reiki will give them deep relaxation and reduce pain. Again and again these same themes emerge from promotional literature on Reiki—relaxation, well-being, reduce illness, reduce stress, balance your mind, etc.  How can one say that Reiki is bad when it claims to help people?

The reason for this level of acceptance is easy to understand. Most people, many Christians included, believe if something is spiritually positive then it is of God. A pastor friend of mine recounted a situation in which a Christian, who had some physical problems, turned to Reiki for comfort. When this pastor advised the man that Reiki fundamentally opposed the Christian faith he became furious and responded with the following defense, “How can you say this is bad when it helped me?” That is why I titled a chapter in my book “Discernment.” To discern is to “try the spirits” (1 John 4:1). If something is of God it will conform to the very cornerstone of God’s plan to show His grace through Christ Jesus and Him alone (Ephesians 2:7). Reiki, as I defined earlier, is based on the occult view of God.

This assessment of Reiki is beyond question. Every Reiki book I have ever seen is chock full of pronouncements that back up the point I am trying to make. In The Everything Reiki Book, the following clears up any doubt about Reiki’s incompatibility with Christianity:

During the Reiki attunement process, the avenue that is opened within the body to allow Reiki to flow through also opens up the psychic communication centers.  This is why many Reiki practitioners report having verbalized channeled communications with the spirit world.6

What is even more disturbing is that the Reiki channeler may not even have control over this “energy” as the following comment shows:

Nurses and massage therapists who have been attuned to Reiki may never disclose when Reiki starts flowing from their palms as they handle their patients. Reiki will naturally “kick in” when it is needed and will continue to flow for as long as the recipient is subconsciously open to receiving it.7

Another such method is Therapeutic Touch. Like Reiki, it is based on the occultic chakra system, portrayed as the seven energy centers in the body aligned with spiritual forces. The seventh chakra identifies with the God-in-all view. Therapeutic Touch is widely practiced by nurses in clinics and hospitals. It is seen as a helpful and healing adjunct to nursing care.

If the connection between Reiki healing and other metaphysical practices can be seen, then we more fully understand why the following quote is one of the most powerful statements as to the true nature of contemplative prayer. A Reiki master in the course of promoting the acceptance of this method relayed:

Anyone familiar with the work of . . . or the thought of . . . [she then listed a string of notable New Age writers with Thomas Merton right in the center of them] will find compatibility and resonance with the theory and practices of Reiki.8

Reiki comes from Buddhism, and as one Merton scholar wrote, “The God he [Merton] knew in prayer was the same experience that Buddhists describe in their enlightenment.”9

This is why it is so important to understand the connection between the writings of Richard Foster and Brennan Manning with Merton. Promotion indicates attachment, and attachment indicates common ground. Something is terribly wrong when a Reiki master and two of the most influential figures in the evangelical church today both point to the same man as an example of their spiritual path.  (To read more about Reiki and energy healing, read “The Truth About Energy Healing” by Ray Yungen.)

Notes:

1. “Healing Hands”  (New Woman Magazine, March, 1986), p. 78.
2. William Rand, Reiki: The Healing Touch  (Southfield, MI: Vision Pub.,1991), p. 48.
3. Diane Stein, Essential Reiki (Berkley, CA: Crossing Press, 1995), p. 107.
4. William Lee Rand, “Reiki, A New Direction” (Reiki News, Spring 1998, http://www.reiki.org/reikinews/reikinewdir.html,, p. 4.
5. Reiki News, Winter, 1998, p. 5.
6. Phylameana lila Desy, The Everything Reiki Book (Avon, MA: Adams Media, 2004), p. 144.
7. Ibid., p. 270.
8. Janeanne Narrin, One Degree Beyond: A Reiki Journey into Energy Medicine (Seattle, WA: Little White Buffalo, 1998), p.xviii.
9. Brian C. Taylor, Setting the Gospel Free (New York, NY: Continuum Publishing , 1996), p. 76.


Lighthouse Trails RSS Feed
**SHOP FOR BOOKS/DVDS**

SEARCH ENTIRE SITE
Categories
Calendar
June 2017
S M T W T F S
« May    
 123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
252627282930  
Archives
Show Buttons
Hide Buttons