Posts Tagged ‘driscoll’

Mark Driscoll’s Distorted View on Noah and Salvation . . . (And How Some People Have a Very Strange Idea as to the Meaning of God’s Salvation)

driscoll-noahLTRP Note: With the release of the Hollywood movie Noah and its blasphemous representation of God’s truth as told in the Bible and an outright attack on Bible-believing Christians, coupled with emerging Christian figures (such as Mark Driscoll who misses the point while trying to make a point in his claims that Noah was not a righteous man1), the article below by Dr. Harry Ironside is timely.

Unfortunately, teachers like Mark Driscoll further confuse the Gospel message. In Driscoll’s so-called defense of the biblical account of Noah, he says that the Noah account was an example of God’s grace and that it had nothing to do with Noah’s righteousness or even Noah’s faith in God. And in fact, in a sermon by Mark Driscoll, he says that Noah was “bad all of the time” (see video clip below). This is a commonly believed and twisted view of God and salvation that says God chooses some and rejects others, based on nothing more than God’s own personal whim rather than on one’s  faith or trust in God (“without faith it is impossible to please [God]”—Hebrews 11:6). In actuality, the story of Noah is about God saving the one man on the earth who had faith in God as Dr. Ironside explains below. And Scripture is very clear that God called Noah a righteous man.

In this day and age when not only the world but also Christian leaders are turning a blind eye to sin, looking for an excuse to sin (such as World Vision’s recent announcement that they were going to start hiring homosexual couples2), let us, as Bible-believing Christians, remember that while we know we are saved only by God’s grace and of no righteousness of our own, we are to strive to be holy (sanctified, set apart) as God is holy (1 Peter 1:16), forsaking the ways of the world to walk with Him. It is the life and righteousness of Christ in us that compels us and gives us the strength that we so desperately need.

By whom also we have access by faith into this grace wherein we stand, and rejoice in hope of the glory of God. (Romans 5:2)

For by grace are ye saved through faith; and that not of yourselves: it is the gift of God. (Ephesians 2:8)

Noah was a just man and perfect in his generations, and Noah walked with God. (Genesis 6:9)

Thus did Noah; according to all that God commanded him, so did he. (Genesis 6:22)

And the Lord said unto Noah, Come thou and all thy house into the ark; for thee have I seen righteous before me in this generation. (Genesis 7:1)

The word of the Lord came again to me, saying, Son of man, when the land sinneth against me by trespassing grievously, then will I stretch out mine hand upon it, and will break the staff of the bread thereof, and will send famine upon it, and will cut off man and beast from it: Though these three men, Noah, Daniel, and Job, were in it, they should deliver but their own souls by their righteousness, saith the Lord God. (Ezekiel 14:12-14)

By faith Noah, being warned of God of things not seen as yet, moved with fear, prepared an ark to the saving of his house; by the which he condemned the world, and became heir of the righteousness which is by faith. (Hebrews 11:7)

And spared not the old world, but saved Noah the eighth person, a preacher of righteousness, bringing in the flood upon the world of the ungodly; (2 Peter 2:5)

By Dr. Harry Ironside

Salvation is beautifully illustrated away back in the Old Testament. You remember when God was about to bring the flood of judgment upon the earth, He commanded Noah to build an ark for the saving of his house. Then when the ark was all completed, God said to Him, “Come thou and all thy house into the ark.” When they entered the ark, they were safe there until the judgment was passed, until in God’s due time they came out upon a new earth.

Noah, like Abraham, is a very striking example of one who has been declared righteous because of his faith. It was faith that led him to prepare an ark for the saving of his house, when there seemed no evidence of a coming flood. It was faith that led him to obey God and enter that ark, with all his family, when commanded to do so by God. Inside the ark all were secure until the deluge was over. They were kept by omnipotent power. The ark bore all the brunt of the storm. Noah and his household were shut in by God, who had Himself closed the door. The same hand that shut them in shut all the unbelieving antediluvian world outside. The ark was a type of Christ. All who are in Christ are eternally secure.

Suppose when the ark was completed God had said, “Now, Noah, go and get eight large, strong spikes and drive them into the side of the ark.” Imagine Noah procuring these spikes and doing as commanded. Then when each spike was securely fastened, let us presume that God said, “Come thou and all thy house and take hold of these spikes, and all who hang on to the end of the flood will be saved.” How long do you think Noah and the rest would have been secure?

I can imagine each one taking hold of a spike—then the waters rising as the rain poured down. In a few minutes, they would have been soaked to the skin. Then think of the terrific strain on joints and muscles as the ark was lifted from the earth and began its perilous voyage through the raging waters. I think I hear Noah calling to his wife, “Mother, how is it going; all is well?”

And she calls back, “I’m holding on. Do pray for me that I may be able to hold out to the end!”

Soon poor Mrs. Ham would cry out, “It’s no use, can’t hang on any longer. I am going to backslide.” And she would let go and be swept away by the flood. How long do you suppose it would be before every one of them would be obliged to let go and so go down to death?

Thank God, that is not a true picture of His salvation. He is not calling men to hang on to Christ. But just as Noah entered into the ark and found there perfect security, so every believer is in Christ and saved for eternity. It is not a question of our ability to hang on, but of Christ’s ability to carry us safely through to the glory. He who has begun the good work in us will perfect it until the day of manifestation.

When God justifies a sinner, that sinner is in Christ; and there is no condemnation to those who are in Christ Jesus. It is true that inside the ark order should prevail. I have no doubt that Noah and his family all sought to behave themselves inside the ark as those who owed everything to the matchless grace of God which had delivered them. So you and I should devote all our lives and powers to the glory of Him who has saved us. But our salvation does not depend upon our devotedness and faithfulness. It depends upon His faithfulness. “He is faithful who hath promised.”

(From Dr. Ironside’s book, Great Words of the Gospel – chapter 10 – public domain)

Video clip of Mark Driscoll saying Noah was not a righteous man:
(posting this video is not meant to be an endorsement of the source but rather posted for informational and research purposes)

Multi-Sensory Worship: Prayer Stations, Icons, Incense, and Candles

by Roger Oakland 
Understand the Times
(author of Faith Undone: the emerging church—a new reformation or an end-time deception)

Stimulating images that provide spiritual experiences are an essential element of the emerging church. While many are bewildered as to why their churches are darkening their sanctuaries and setting up prayer stations with candles, incense, and icons, promoters of the emerging church movement say they know exactly what they are doing. Mark Driscoll of Mars Hill Fellowship explains:

Everything in the service needs to preach–architecture, lighting, songs, prayers, fellowship, the smell–it all preaches. All five senses must be engaged to experience God.1

Often, Christians who have been attending church all their lives find the changes their pastors are implementing disconcerting, as they see the trend away from Bible teaching to multi-sensory stimulation. Dan Kimball quotes an older gentleman who had expressed his concerns about the implementation of an emerging style of mystical worship:

Dan, why did you use incense? I am not sure I like walking over to those prayer stations with all those props; can’t we just pray from our seats? Why aren’t you just preaching just the Bible? I wasn’t too comfortable when you had those times of silence, and it’s a little too dark in there for me.2

The comment by this gentleman in his seventies is typical of the comments I hear from many as I travel and speak at conferences around North America. But comments like this not only come from the elderly; many younger people are saying the same things. Both young and old are becoming concerned as they see multi-sensory mystical worship replace the preaching and teaching of the Word.

Nevertheless, Kimball and many others are convinced they are on the right path based on their view that emerging generations desire a multi-sensory worship experience. For example, in a chapter of Kimball’s book titled “Creating a Sacred Space for Vintage Worship” Kimball states:

[A]esthetics is not an end in itself. But in our culture, which is becoming more multi-sensory and less respectful of God, we have a responsibility to pay attention to the design of the space where we assemble regularly. In the emerging culture, darkness represents spirituality. We see this in Buddhist temples, as well as Catholic and Orthodox churches. Darkness communicates that something serious is happening.3

Kimball further states:

How ironic that returning to a raw and ancient form of worship is now seen as new and even cutting edge. We are simply going back to a vintage form of worship which has been around for as long as the church has been in existence.4

Of course, that is not really true. There is no evidence in the Bible that the disciples or the early church turned to a “raw” form of worship, especially one that needed darkness to help them feel more spiritual. If the early believers were in darkness, it would have been because they were meeting in secret to avoid arrest. To insinuate they were thinking about multi-sensory practices is an insult to their courage and devotion to God. Nowhere in Scripture is there even a hint of this. (For more on the emerging church, read Faith Undone.)

Notes:

1. “The National Reevaluation Forum: The Story of the Gathering,”(Youth Leader Networks – NEXT Special Edition, 1999, click here),pp. 3-8, citing Mark Driscoll, “Themes of the Emerging Church.”
2. Dan Kimball, The Emerging Church, p. 127.
3. Ibid., p. 136.
4. Ibid., p. 169.

Corban University (formerly Western Baptist College), a Former Non-Contemplative College, Teams Up with Mark Driscoll

Corban University of Salem, Oregon used to be called Western Baptist College. It used to be a Christian college that did not promote contemplative spirituality or the emerging church, and it used to be on the Lighthouse Trails “good” Christian colleges list (colleges that don’t promote Spiritual Formation). But that was then, and today is a new day for Corban University.

Zemanta Related Posts ThumbnailLighthouse Trails has watched the slow but steady change at Corban for the last several years, hoping it would not begin to fully engage in the Spiritual Formation movement. But a recent headline about Corban caught the attention of Lighthouse Trails editors who were compelled to respond. The headlines of that article read: “Corban University Signs Unique Partnership Agreement With Mars Hill Church.” In that article, it states:

Starting in the fall of 2014, Corban University of Salem, Ore. and Mars Hill Church will offer a 24-credit Bible certificate at the Mars Hill Bellevue, Wash. location. Classes are slated to begin in the fall of 2014.

The curriculum will include Bible and Theology Foundation, Ministry Skills Foundation, Introduction to Bible, Introduction to Theology, Christian Worldview and Apologetics, Biblical Spiritual Formation, Gospels, Bible Study Methods.

“We are anticipating a great, ongoing relationship with Mars Hill Church, pending approval of the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities,” said Corban Provost Matt Lucas.

The article talks about the huge influence that Mars Hill (home to Mark Driscoll)  has with “15 locations in five different states, reaching millions around the world.” Mark Driscoll has been the topic of several LT articles because of his promotion of contemplative spirituality and other emerging beliefs (see our research links and video below documenting Driscoll’s mockery of biblical eschatology related to the last days and the Lord’s return).

Lighthouse Trails first became involved with Corban University (then Western Baptist) in 2002, when it was discovered that a summer youth theater day camp being held at Corban was introducing children attending the camp to visualization techniques. An editor at Lighthouse Trails arranged a meeting with three Corban professors to explain the concerns (it so happened that one of the LT editor’s children was attending that camp). At that time, the concerns by Lighthouse Trails were dismissed by the professors as erroneous. The LT editor took that opportunity to warn Corban professors that if they did not take a pro-active stand against the contemplative prayer movement and the emerging church and make sure all of their instructors understood the dangers, in time, the school would become an adherent to these heretical teachings.

Shortly after  A Time of Departing by Ray Yungen was released in the fall of 2002, Corban professor Dr. Robert Wright invited Ray to address his World Religions & Cults class. From that point on, Dr. Wright became a strong advocate for Yungen’s and Lighthouse Trails’ message and had Ray return on several subsequent years. At one point, Dr. Wright wrote an article about the emerging church, which LT carries to this day on the research site. In that article Dr. Wright called Ray Yungen a “competent researcher” of the New Age and mysticism and that “[t]he methods of contemplative prayer are the same as those used in Eastern religion.” Dr. Wright said that some “very popular authors in the evangelical church have latched on to contemplative prayer as a way to go deeper with God.” And then he names Richard Foster and Brennan Manning. Of contemplative prayer, Dr. Wright stated:

[T]he purpose of contemplative prayer is to enter an altered state of consciousness in order to find one’s true self, thus finding God. This true self relates to the belief that man is basically good. Christian proponents of contemplative prayer teach that all human beings have a divine center and that all, not just born again believers, should practice contemplative prayer.

Unfortunately, Lighthouse Trails began to notice that not all the faculty at Corban held to the same convictions that Dr. Wright did. For instance in 2007, in Corban Magazine in an article titled “Understanding the Emerging Church Movement,” a book co-authored by contemplative author J.P. Moreland, was recommended (see page 11).  The Corban article made several comments that indicated some at Corban did not have a good understanding of the emerging church movement. One comment, made by Corban professor Sam Baker, echoed contemplative J.P. Moreland. Baker stated: “The extreme of rationalism is that we worship the Bible instead of the God of the Bible.” J.P. Moreland, in a Christianity Today article, says that Christians are too committed to the Bible: “In the actual practices of the Evangelical community in North America, there is an over-commitment to Scripture in a way that is false, irrational, and harmful to the cause of Christ.”

Also in that Corban article, Sam Baker suggests we must be careful not to “throw the baby out with the bath water” when it comes to the emerging church. In regard to “mystical ancient rites,” Baker said that “some people have found these practices to be beneficial to their faith.” He says that if the practices produce good results, then they have “merit.” However, as Lighthouse Trails has often pointed out, just because one’s intent is “good” does not legitimize practices that are clearly Hinduistic and New Age in nature. Baker says that the emerging church has “stirred believers’ interest in meditation.”

The following year after the Corban Magazine article came out, Lighthouse Trails learned that Corban had invited an emergent speaker, Dan Merchant (Lord Save Us From Your Followers) to speak. In a December 2008 LT article titled “Concerns Over ‘Lord Save Us From Your Followers’ Author Speaking at Corban College,”  it stated:

In Corban’s Winter 2008 magazine the following is stated: “Dr. Kent Kersey [Corban campus pastor] brought Dan Merchant and his documentary, Lord Save Us From Your Followers, to campus as a conversation-starter. The film takes a critical look at American Christianity.” A Corban news article titled “Lord, Save Us From Your Followers’ gets ‘followers’ thinking” explains that Merchant spoke at Corban’s chapel service and later answered questions students had. “Campus Pastor Kent Kersey hoped the film would ’cause discussions.’ He deemed the event successful, therefore, because many classrooms have been abuzz since Merchant’s presentation, not to mention the informal conversations taking place.” The article said that Kersey believed “the message of the movie paralleled the maxim of St. Francis of Assisi, Preach the Gospel.” On Kersey’s blog, he says Merchant’s message is “compelling” and perhaps through it God is trying to say something to Christians (Kersey’s blog post was removed from the Internet:  http://kentkersey.blogspot.com/2008/10/its-all-about-listening.html).

However, the gospel Dan Merchant is promoting may be a “different gospel” and “another Jesus” (II Cor. 11:4) than that of the Bible. In the last chapter of the book Lord Save Us From Your Followers titled “The sea refuses NO RIVER,” Merchant refers to the people he interviewed over the course of the last few years. They represent many different religious, sexual, and political persuasions, including atheists and practicing homosexuals. Calling them “wonderful children of God,” he adds: “I know we’re both children of God. If they don’t know it shouldn’t change anything for me and I know it doesn’t change anything for God.”

Back in 2008, if you typed the term “Spiritual Formation” into the Corban search engine, nothing would come up. Today, the term comes up around 30 times. One of the reasons is that when Corban became a university, they developed a Masters degree program with a concentration in Spiritual Formation. It’s in other places too, like the Major in Student and Family Ministry where TH463 Biblical Spiritual Formation is one of the courses. (Incidentally, there is no such thing as “Biblical” Spiritual Formation. Spiritual Formation is a term that is tied in with contemplative spirituality – just ask Richard Foster, a pioneer of the Spiritual Formation movement, if Spiritual Formation can exclude contemplative).

And today, a look at the Fall 2013 Corban textbook list is disheartening to say the least.  Professor Kersey is using Phyllis Tickle’s The Great Emergence, John Franke’s Barth for Arm Chair Theologians (Barth’s ideas are highly favored by the emerging church) and Marcus Borg’s The Heart of Christianity in TH413. You can’t get more emergent than Tickle and Borg. Borg actually denies basic tenets of the Christian faith such as the virgin birth and the deity of Christ. Tickle thinks Brian McLaren could be the next Luther. Professor Kersey also uses textbooks by John Piper, a contemplative advocate. At least one other course, IS202, is using a Piper book as well.

We did thankfully notice in the Fall 2013 textbook list that Dr. Wright is still using A Time of Departing in his World Religions & Cults Class at Corban. However, all of the books being used that are pro-contemplative, pro-emerging in other classes at Corban by other professors send a message loud and clear to Corban students that contemplative/emerging is OK. Another example is the Senior Seminar course where Professor Gilbert is using Dan Allender’s book Leading With a Limp. Allender resonates with Brian McLaren (McLaren is listed in the acknowledgements in Leading With a Limp). Gilbert also uses a book by Allender in the Group Dynamics course (To Be Told: God Invites You to Coauthor Your Future).

Corban professors may defend themselves and say they are just using these books to take the good from them and leave out the bad (following Baker’s injunction not to “throw out the baby with the bathwater”). But why do students have to be immersed in heresy to spot it? Wouldn’t reading the Word and biblically solid books do a better job? Why is it that after a decade Ray Yungen’s book is still confined to just one professor’s class? We know for a fact that a high percentage of Corban students are attending an extremely contemplative/emerging church in Salem, Oregon. These students are getting it from every direction. Do their parents, who are paying high dollars to get their children a Christian college education, realize what their kids are being exposed to at church and at college? Most of them, probably not.

The Corban Music Department has been affected by contemplative/emerging spirituality too. In MU403, a book by Constance Cherry titled The Worship Architect: A Blueprint for Designing Culturally Relevant and Biblically Faithful Services is being used as the textbook. Cherry is one of the faculty at the Robert E. Webber Institute for Worship Studies (that should be called the Institute for EMERGING Worship Studies). The late Robert Webber was a foundational figure in building momentum for the emerging church.

We could give many other examples to show that contemplative/emerging has taken root at Corban University. A few more are: Biblical Leadership in Education using Phil Yancey’s book, The Jesus I Never Knew; BA593 using Peter Drucker’s The Effective Executive; Professor Baker in CM333 using contemplative Mark DeVries’ Sustainable Youth Ministry; CM641 using Bill Hybels Axiom; and CM501 using textbooks by contemplative Bruce Demarest (Seasons of the Soul and Four Views on Christian Spirituality).

Finally, we’ll look at a Corban class called Servant Leadership (a term largely used in the emerging church to liken Jesus to a good model or servant to follow rather than to a Savior from sin). In that particular class, a book titled The Servant: A Simple Story by James C. Hunter is the textbook. We could say many things about this book, but we’ll just point to the acknowledgements page where Hunter thanks emergent Tony Campolo and New Ager M. Scott Peck for their “skills in articulating some of the great truths of life” and “Simon, monk and archabbey librarian, St. Meinrad Monastery, St. Meinrad, Indiana for sharing “the ropes” of monastic life” with him. We find it astounding that Hunter’s book is the best Corban could do to teach students how to be good leaders. A book that thanks a Catholic Benedictine monastic monk, an emergent leader, and a New Ager for truths about life!

Lighthouse Trails editors find it nothing short of a tragedy that Corban has ended up in the contemplative minefield of Christian colleges. Now that they are partnering with Mark Driscoll, the descent into apostasy will no doubt be hastened more than ever.

Research Articles on Mark Driscoll (see video below):

Anti-Religion Jeff Bethke (from Driscoll’s church) Hits the News Again – New Book, Same Message: “Imagine No Religion”

A Pastor Speaks Up: Mark Driscoll and the New “Sexual Spirituality”

COMPARISON: “New Spirituality” Leaders Reject and Ridicule the Second Coming of the Lord VERSUS Bible Prophecies Standing in Stark Contrast

Mark Driscoll and Liberty University Are Good Match – Both Promote Contemplative Spirituality

NEW BOOKLET: A Directory of Authors (Three NOT Recommended Lists)

A Directory of Authors (Three NOT Recommended Lists) written and compiled by Chris Lawson is our newest Lighthouse Trails Print Booklet Tract. The Booklet Tract is 14 pages long and sells for $1.95 for single copies. Quantity discounts are as much as 50% off retail.  Below is the content of the booklet. To order copies of  A Directory of Authors (Three NOT Recommended Lists), click here

A-Directory-Of-Authors-Three-NOT-Recommended-ListsA Directory of Authors (Three NOT Recommended Lists)

Written and Compiled by Chris Lawson

 It is no secret these days that Christian bookstore and ministry resource databases are often jam-packed with so-called Christian resources that are actually promoting anything but biblical Christianity. Special care may be taken by bookstore owners and ministry leaders alike to ensure that ministry and business are “in order,” but, when a close look is taken, the sale of spiritually unsafe material abounds. This is the primary reason for these three lists—to help warn and protect you, the reader, and to provide a quick reference guide.

You should know that many of the authors listed here profess to follow or glean from “Jesus,” yet at the same time they assiduously reject the biblical Jesus Christ of Nazareth Who is Savior, Lord, and God. In fact, many of these authors teach the absolute antithesis (opposite) of the historic Christian faith. Books rife with New Age occult teachings and practices abound in many Christian bookstores, and many owners and managers are going to sell them, regardless.

Over the past twenty plus years, I have spent thousands of hours researching, examining, and refuting dangerous cultic and occult practices as a missionary, church planter, and pastor. My purpose in doing so has been to help people escape dangerous occult influences, heretical doctrines both inside and outside the church, and the bondage of satanic genius that holds people captive by the powers of darkness.

The Christian literature marketplace has become utterly dangerous in the 21st century. I never thought I would see the day when New Age, occult, eastern-style meditative practices and all manner of aberrant and heretical teachings would become commonplace among Christian bookstores. What’s even worse is that much of this dangerous material is couched in Christian jargon and presented as spiritual paths to deepen and connect more intimately with God.

Considering these things, most of the authors listed in the first two lists profess to be “Christian,” while at the same time writing, recommending, and/or personally endorsing either outright or by proxy, heretical teachings and/or dangerous practices, which are contrary to sound biblical theology.

Discerning believers have expressed deep concern over the apostasy we face in the 21st century churches. The courage to stand firm and “earnestly contend for the faith” (Jude 3) coupled with a deep personal love for the Lord Jesus Christ and His Word are at the very foundation of these believers’ lives. Their concern for the spiritual welfare of the body of Christ has been a deeply motivating factor in this project.

Our Lord Jesus Christ warned, “Take heed that no man deceive you” (Matthew 24:4, Mark 13:5; Luke 21:8). Paul the apostle warned, “Let no man deceive you by any means (2 Thessalonians 2:3). John, the apostle warned, “Little children [believers in Christ], let no man deceive you” (1 John 3:7). Every single New Testament book except one warns about some form of spiritual deception, false teaching, or false teachers. Should we not “take heed,” as God through His very Word has so clearly warned, especially as the days in which we live grow precariously evil.

Scriptural Admonitions, Commands, and Warnings:

Genesis 1:1-12:20; Exodus 19:1-20:26; Deuteronomy 13:1-18; 18:20-22; 1 Samuel 28; Jeremiah 23; Ezekiel chapters 1-3 and 8-11; Daniel 1:8-21; 3:1-25; Zechariah 5:1-11; Matthew 7:1-5, 15-27; 23:1-39; 24:1-51; Mark 9:42-50; 13:1-37; Luke 9:23; John 17; Acts 8:9-25; 19:19-20; 20: 27-31; Romans 16:17-20; 1 Corinthians 6:9-10; 2 Corinthians 6:14-15; 11:1-4, 12-15; Galatians 1:6-10; 2:4-5; Ephesians 4:11-16; 5:11-12; Philippians 1:8-11; 4:17-21; Colossians 1:28-29; 2:8-9; 1 Thessalonians 5:1-22; 2 Thessalonians 1:3-2:16; 1 Timothy 1:3-11,18-20; 4:1-11; 6:3-5,11-12, 20-21; 2 Timothy 1:13-15; 2:1-7,14-26; 3:1-4:22; Titus 1:9-2:18; 3:9-10; Hebrews 5:12-14 and chapters 11 and 12; James 1:1-5:20; 1 Peter 3:18-5:14; 2 Peter 2:2-3:16; 1 John 2:18-23; 4:1-6; 2 John 1-13; 3 John 9-12; Jude 1:1-25; Revelation 2:1-3:22; 11:1-14; 13:1-18; 17:1-20:15.

#1—The New Spirituality in the Church

Each of the following authors professes to be Christian and/or uses biblical terminology in his or her writing, yet promotes at least one of the following serious false teachings: contemplative spirituality (i.e., Spiritual Formation), the emergent, progressive “new” spirituality, the seeker-friendly, church-growth movement (e.g., Willow Creek, Purpose Driven) and/or Yoga.

A

Abbott, David L.

Adams, James Rowe

Allender, Dan

Arico, Carl J.

Armstrong, Karen

Artress, Lauren

Assagioli, Roberto

B

Babbs, Liz

Bakker, Jay

Barton, Ruth Haley

Bass, Diana Butler

Batterson, Mark

Baxter, Mary

Bell, Rob

Benner, David

Bennison, John

Bentley, Todd

Bickle, Mike

Bjorklund, Kurt

Blanchard, Ken

Boa, Kenneth

Bolger, Ryan

Bolz-Weber, Nadia

Bono

Bordenkircher, Susan

Borg, Marcus

Bourgeault, Cynthia

Bronsink, Troy

Brother Lawrence

Brueggemann, Walter

Bruteau, Beatrice

Buchanan, John M.

Budziszewski, J.

Buford, Bob

Burke, Spencer

C

Calhoun, Adele Ahlberg

Caliguire, Mindy

Campbell, Joseph

Campolo, Bart

Campolo, Tony

Canfield, Jack

Card, Michael

Carroll, L. Patrick

Chalke, Steve

Chalmers, Joseph

Chinmoy, Sri

Chittister, Joan

Claiborne, Shane

Coe, John

Coffin, William Sloane

Collins, Jim

Crabb, Larry

Cron, Ian

Crossan, John Dominic

Crowder, David

D

De Mello, Anthony De Waal, Esther

Demarest, Bruce

Dillard, Annie

Dowd, Michael

Dykes, David R

Driscoll, Mark

Drury, Keith

Dyckman, Katherine Marie

E

Edwards, Gene

Edwards, Tilden

Egan, Harvey

Epperly, Bruce

Evans, Rachel Held

F

Felten, David

Fleming, Dave

Flowers, Betty Sue

Ford, Leighton

Fosdick, Harry Emerson

Foster, Richard

Fox, George

Fox, Matthew

Friend, Howard E., Jr.

Funk, Mary Margaret

G

Garrison, Becky

Geering, Lloyd

Gibbs, Eddie

Gire, Ken

Goleman, Daniel

Goll, James

Graham, Dom Alfred

Greig, Pete

Griffin, Emilie

Griffiths, Bede

Gru, Jean-Nicholas

Gungor

H

Haas, Peter Traban

Haight, Roger

Haliczer, Stephen

Hall, Thelma

Hansen, Mark Victor

Hays, Edward

Hazard, David

Healey, Charles

Hedrick, Charles

Hildegard of Bingen

Hipps, Shane

Holmes, Emily

Hougen, Judith

Humphreys, Carolyn

Hunard, Hannah

Hunt, Anne

Hunter, Todd

Hybels, Bill

I

Ignatius Loyola, St.

Issler, Klaus

J

Jager, Willigis

Jenks, Gregory C.

Johnson, Jan

Johnston, William

Jones, Alan

Jones, Laurie Beth

Jones, Tony

K

Kaisch, Ken

Keating, Thomas

Kelsey, Morton

Kent, Keri Wyatt

Kidd, Sue Monk

Kimball, Dan

King, Mike

King, Robert H.

Kraft, Robert A.

Kreeft, Peter

L

L’Engle, Madeleine

Lamott, Anne

Law, William

M

Madigan, Shawn

Main, John

Manning, Brennan

Martin, James

Mattioli, Joseph

Matus, Thomas

May, Gerald

McColman, Carl

McKnight, Scot

McLaren, Brian

McManus, Erwin

Meninger, William

Meyers, Robin R.

Miller, Calvin

Miller, Donald

Moon, Gary

Moore, Beth

Moore, Brian P.

Moran, Michael T.

Moreland, J.P.

Morganthaler, Sally

Mother Theresa

Mundy, Linus

Muyskens, John David

N

Newcomer, Carrie

Norris, Gunilla Brodde

Norris, Kathleen

Nouwen, Henri

O

Ortberg, John

P

Pagels, Elaine

Pagitt, Doug

Palmer, Parker

Paloma, Margaret M.

Patterson, Stephen J.

Peace, Richard

Peale, Norman Vincent

Pennington, Basil

Pepper, Howard

Peterson, Eugene

Piper, John

Plumer, Fred

Pope Benedict XVI

Procter-Murphy, Jeff

R

Rakoczy, Susan

Reininger, Gustave

Rhodes, Tricia

Robbins, Duffy

Robbins, Maggie

Rohr, Richard

Rolle, Richard

Rollins, Peter

Romney, Rodney

Ruether, Rosemary Radford

Rupp, Joyce

Russell, A.J.

Ryan, Thomas

S

Sampson, Will

Sanford, Agnes

Scandrette, Mark

Scazzero, Pete

Schuller, Robert

Selmanovic, Samir

Senge, Peter

Shannon, William

Shore, John

Sinetar, Marsha

Sittser, Gerald

Smith, Chuck, Jr.

Smith, Elizabeth

Smith, James Bryan

Southerland, Dan

Spangler, Ann

Spong, John Shelby

St. Romain, Philip

Stanley, Andy

Steindl-Rast, David

Strobel, Kyle

Sweet, Leonard

T

Talbot, John Michael

Tasto, Maria

Taylor, Barbara Brown

Teague, David

Thomas, Gary

Thompson, Marjorie

Thresher, Tom

Tiberghien, Susan

Tickle, Phyllis

Treece, Patricia

Tuoti, Frank

Twiss, Richard

V

Vaswig, William (Bill)

Virkler, Mark

Voskamp, Ann

W

Wallis, Jim

Wakefield, James

Ward, Benedicta

Ward, Karen

Warren, Rick

Webber, Robert

Wilhoit, James C.

Willard, Dallas

Wilson-Hartgrove, Jonathan

Winner, Lauren

Wink, Walter

Wolsey, Roger

Wright, N.T.

Y

Yaconelli, Mark

Yaconelli, Mike

Yancey, Phillip

Yanni, Kathryn A.

Yarian, Br. Karekin M., BSG

Young, Sarah

Young, William Paul

Yungblut, John R.

Z

Zeidler, Frank P.

#2—CHRISTIAN AND NON-CHRISTIAN MYSTICS OF THE PAST

Mystics from the past oftentimes favorably endorsed by “Christian” authors today

Middle Ages (Medieval Times) and Renaissance

Angela of Foligno (1248-1309)

 Anthony of Padua (1195-1231)

 Bernard of Clairvaux (1090-1153)

 Bonaventure (1217-1274)

 Catherine of Siena (1347-1380)

 Desert Fathers, The

 Hadewijch of Antwerp (13th century)

 Henry Suso (1295-1366)

 Hildegard of Bingen (1098-1179)

 Hugh of Saint Victor (1096-1141)

 Jacopone da Todi (1230-1306)

 Johannes Tauler (d.1361)

 John of Ruysbroeck (1293-1381)

 John Scotus Eriugena (810-877)

 Julian of Norwich (1342-1416)

 Mechthild of Magdeburg (1212-1297)

 Meister Eckhart (1260-1327)

 Richard of Saint Victor (d.1173)

 Richard Rolle (1300-1341)

 The Cloud of the Unknowing (anonymous, instruction in mysticism, 1375)

 Theologia Germanica (anonymous, mystical treatise, late 14th century)

 Thomas a’ Kempis (1380-1471)

 Thomas Aquinas (1225-1274)

 Walter Hilton (1340-1396)

Renaissance, Reformation, and Counter-Reformation

Brother Lawrence (1614–1691)

 Emanuel Swedenborg (1688-1822)

 George Fox (1624–1691)

 Ignatius of Loyola (1491–1556)

 Jakob Böhme (1575-1624)

John of the Cross (Juan de Yepes) (1542–1591)

 Joseph of Cupertino (1603-1663)

 Madame Guyon (1647-1717)

 Teresa of Ávila (1515–1582)

 Theophan the Recluse (1815-1894)

 William Law (1686–1761)

Modern Era (19th—20th Century)

Alexandrina Maria da Costa (1904–1955)

 Bernadette Roberts (1931–)

 Berthe Petit (1870–1943)

 Carmela Carabelli (1910–1978)

 Domenico da Cese (1905-1978

 Evelyn Underhill (1875-1941)

 Flower A. Newhouse (1909-1994)

 Frank Laubach (1884–1970)

 Frederick Buechner (1926-)

 Karl Rahner (1904-1984)

 Lúcia Santos (1907-2005)

Maria Pierina de Micheli (1890–1945)

 Maria Valtorta (1898-1963)

 Marie Lataste (1822–1899)

 Marie Martha Chambon (1841–1907)

 Martin Buber (1868-1965)

 Mary Faustina Kowalska (1905–1938)

 Mary of Saint Peter (1816–1848)

 Mary of the Divine Heart (1863–1899)

 Padre Pio of Pietrelcina (1887–1968)

 Pierina Gilli (1911–1991)

 Pierre Teilhard de Chardin (1881- 1955)

 Simone Weil (1909-1943)

 Soren Kierkegaard (1813-1855)

 Thomas Merton (1915–1968)

 Thomas Raymond Kelly (1893–1941)

#3—New Age Movement

Each of the following authors promotes one or more of the following: New Age/Eastern philosophy and/or meditation, New Thought religion, Kaballah, Sufism, and/or Buddhism.

A

Aaron, David

Adiswarananda, Swami

Aitken, Robert

Alexander, Eben

Amen, Daniel

Anand, Margot

Anderson, Joan Wester

Anderson, Keleah

Armstrong, Karen

Au, Wilkie

B

Bailey, Alice

Baker-Fletcher, Karen

Ballard, Jim

Ban Breathnach, Sarah

Barnstone, Willis

Beattie, Melody

Berg, Michael

Besserman, Perle

Bestler, Emily

Beversluis, Joel D.

Blavatsky, Helena

Boon, Brooke

Boorstein, Sylvia

Bordenkircher, Susan

Borris, Dan

Borysenko, Joan

Boyce, Tillman

Bradshaw, John

Brandt, Beverly F.

Browne, Sylvia

Bryant, Christopher

Buck, Roland

Buri, Fritz

Burnham, Sophy

Burroughs, Kendra Crossen

Butterworth, Eric

Lorna Byrne

Byrne, Rhonda

C

Calamari, Barbara

Cameron, Julia

Camp, Carole

Candolini, G.T.

Campbell, Peter A.

Cannon, Noreen

Capacchione, Lucia

Childs, Hal

Chilson, Richard

Chittick, William C.

Chodron, Pema

Chopra, Deepak

Choquette, Sonia

Christ, Carol P.

Clemens, Nancy

Clifton, Chas

Cole-Whittaker, Terry

Conlon, James. A

Connell, Janice T.

Cooper, David E.

Cousin, Pierre Jean

Covey, Stephen R.

D

D’Arcy, Paula

Dalai Lama, The

Daley, Rosie

Dass, Ram

Déchanet, J.M.

De Michelis, Elizabeth

Dole, George F.

Doniger, Wendy

Dossey, Larry

Downey, Roma

Drosnin, Michael

Dueck, Alvin

Dyer, Wayne W.

E

Eadie, Betty

Easwaran, Eknath

Egeberg, Gary

Ehlers, Lesley

Eliade, Mircea

Elkins, Rita

Emonet, Pierre-Marie

Epstein, Perle

Evans, Cheryl

Wentz-Evans, W.Y.

F

Farnham, Timothy J.

Fay, Martha

Ferguson, Marilyn

Fischer, Norman

Ford-Grabowski, Mary

Fox, Emmet

Freeman, Laurence

Fried, Gregory

Fleming, Dave

G

Gach, Gary

Galdone, Paul

Gawain, Shakti

Gebara, Ivone

Geirsson, Heimer

Goehring, James E.

Goldsmith, Joel S.

Goldwag, Arthur

Goleman, Daniel P.

Good, Deidre J.

Gordon, Jon

Gover, Tzivar

Gray, John

Green, Arthur

Gruagach, Ben

Guenon, Rene

H

Hamilton, Jeffrey D.

Hamma, Robert M.

Hammer, Olav

Hanh, Thich Nhat

Harman, Willis

Harley, Gail M.

Harris, Paul

Harvey, Andrew

Hay, Louise

Hays, Edward

Hecht, Richard

Heidegger, Martin

Heine, Steven

Hendricks, Gay

Herman, A.L.

Herrigel, Eugene

Hicks, Esther and Jerry

Hinton, David

Hite, Sheilaa

Hoffman, Lawrence A.

Holbrook, George

Hornung, Eri

Hubbard, Barbara Marx

Hulnick, Ron and Mary

Huxley, Aldous

Hyman, Mark

I

Idel, Moshe

Isherwood, Lisa

Ivker, Robert S.

J

Jackson, Carl T.

Jacobs, Alan

Jampolsky, Gerald

Janis, Sharon

Jaoudi, Maria

Jesseph, Joe R.

Jobarteh, Sona

Johnson, Ben

Jones, James William

Jones, John Miriam

Jordan, E. Bernard

Jubien, Michael

Jung, Carl

K

Kabat-Zinn, Jon

Kadowaki, Kakichi

Karma, Glin-Pa

Kaufman, Paul

Kautz, Richard A.

Keizan, Zen Master

Kelder, Peter

Kellert, Stephen R.

Kessler, David

King, Karen L.

Kirvan, John

Klostermaier, Klaus K.

Kraftsow, Gary

Krohn, Katherine

Kubler-Ross, Elisabeth

Kuhn, Christian

Kushner, Aryeh

Kushner, Lawrence

L

Lawrence, Ronald Melvin

Layton, Bentley

Lefebure, Leo

Leong, Kenneth S.

Levine, Stephen

Littlejohn, Scott C.

Lipton, Bruce

Loori, John Daido

Lopez, Donald S, Jr.

Louthan, Howard

Loya, Joseph A.

Loyd, Alex

Luby, Thia

Ludemann, Gerd

M

MacInnes, Elaine

Macqueen, Gailand

Maddocks, Fiona

Marshall, S. J.

Martin, Nancy

Mascaro, Juan

Matt, Daniel

McGinn, Benard

McMahon, Edwin M.

Metcalf, Franz

Meyer, Marvin

Momen, Moojan

Morgan, Peggy

Morrissey, Mary Manin

Mozumdar, K.

Muller, Wayne

Mundy, Jon

Myss, Carolyn

N

Newell, Philip J.

Nichols, Steve

Nietzsche, Friedrich

Northrup, Christiane

O

O’Donohue, John

O’Flatery, Wendy Doniger

Oliver, Harold H.

Olson, Diane C.

Ornish, Dean

Öz, Mehmet Cengiz, (Dr. Oz)

P

Palihawadana, Mahinda

Papus (Gérard Encausse)

Peck, M. Scott

Petulla, Joseph

Po, Li

R

Ramer, Andrew

Rand, William Lee

Randazzo, Anthony, Fr.

Raub, John Jacob

Ray, Michael

Redfield, James

Ribner, Melinda

Richardson, Cheryl

Richardson, Jabez

Robbins, Anthony (Tony)

Roth, Nancy, L.

Roth, Ron

Rupp, Joyce

S

Sansone, Leslie

Scott, S.M.

Schachter-Shalomi, Zalman

Schucman, Helen

Seidman, Richard

Severance, John B.

Sharma, Arvind

Shaw, Beth

Sheldrake, Alfred Rupert

Siegel, Bernie, Dr.

Silverman, Krishna

Smart, Ninan

Smith, Huston

Smith, Peter

Song, Choan-Seng

Sosa, Ernest

Spangler, David

Sri Chinmoy

Star, Jonathan

Steiger, Brad

Steiner, Rudolph

Stephan, Danette

Storch, Walburga

Stryk, Lucien

Sturtevant, William C.

Sundararajan, K.R.

Swami, Sri Purohit

Swedenborg, Emanuel

T

Taylor, Jeremy

Taylor, Terry Lynn

Teasdale, Wayne

Templeton, John Marks

Tice, Paul

Tide-Mark Press

Tolle, Eckhart

Tooker, Elisabeth

Tracy, Brian

Tsu, Lao (Lao Tsu)

Tucker, Mary Evelyn

U

Ulanov, Ann Belford

V

Van de Weyer, Robert

Van Inwagen, Peter

Vanzant, Iyanla

Virtue, Doreen

W

Walters, Kerry

Watts, Alan

Walsch, Neale Donald

Walsh, Birell

Weiming, Tu

Weil, Andrew

Weiss, Brian

Wilber, Ken

Williams, Jacqueline A.

Williams, Raymond Brady

Williamson, Marianne

Wineman, Aryeh

Wines, Leslie

Whit, David Gordon

Wilkinson, Philip

Winfrey, Oprah

Wolf, Laibl

Wright, Dale S.

Wyatt, Thomas

Y

Yogananda, Paramahansa

Yoke, Ho Pen

Young, Serinity

Z

Zaleski, Carol

Zaleski, Philip

Zimmer, Heinrich

Zuercher, Suzanne

Zukav, Gary

To order copies of  A Directory of Authors (Three NOT Recommended Lists), click here. 

NEW BOOKLET TRACT: They Hate Christianity But Love (Another) Jesus

They Hate Christianity But Love (Another) Jesus – How Conservative Christians Are Being Manipulated and Ridiculed, Especially During Election Years written by the Editors at Lighthouse Trails is our newest Lighthouse Trails Print Booklet Tract. The booklet tract is 14 pages long and sells for $1.95 for single copies. Quantity discounts are as much as 50% off retail.  Below is the content of the booklet. To order copies of They Hate Christianity But Love (Another) Jesus, click here. There is also an Appendix in the booklet that summarizes news articles to show a definite effort to alter the sociopolitical views of conservative Bible-believing Christian adults and their young adult children during a presidential election year.

They Hate Christianity But Love (Another) Jesus“They Hate Christianity But Love (Another) Jesus – How Conservative Christians Are Being Manipulated and Ridiculed, Especially During Election Years”

In 2008, which was an election year, books, videos, broadcasts, and news articles were pouring into mainstream America with a guilt-ridden message that basically manipulated conservative Christians into thinking that either they shouldn’t vote because “Jesus wouldn’t vote,” or they shouldn’t vote on morality issues such as abortion or homosexuality. Suddenly, all over the place, there was talk about “destroying Christianity,” or “liking Jesus but not the church,” or “Jesus for president” (suggesting that maybe we could get Him on the ballot but certainly we shouldn’t vote for anyone already on the ballot). It all sounded very noble to many. After all, everybody knows there is so much political corruption in high government and certainly as much hypocrisy within the walls of many proclaiming Christian leaders and celebrities.

This special report by Lighthouse Trails is not going to attempt to answer the question, “Should a Christian vote?” But we hope to at least show that things are not always as they seem, and what may appear “noble” and good may not be so at all.

In January of 2012, another election year, a young man, Jefferson (Jeff) Bethke, who attends contemplative advocate Mark Driscoll’s church, Mars Hill in Washington state, posted a video on YouTube called “Why I Hate Religion, But Love Jesus.” Within hours, the video had over 100,000 hits. Soon it reached over 14 million hits, according to the Washington Post, one of the major media that has spotlighted the Bethke video (hits as of May 2013 are over 25 million).
The Bethke video is a poem Bethke wrote and recites in a rap-like fashion his thoughts and beliefs about the pitfalls of what he calls “religion” but what is indicated to be Christianity. While we are not saying at this time that Bethke is an emerging figure, and while some of the lyrics in his poem are true statements, it is interesting that emerging spirituality figures seem to be resonating with Bethke’s message. They are looking for anything that will give them ammunition against traditional biblical Christianity. They have found some in Bethke’s poem. Like so many in the emerging camp say, Bethke’s poem suggests that Christians don’t take care of the poor and needy. While believers in Christ have been caring for the needy for centuries, emerging figures use this ploy to win conservative Christians (through guilt) over to a liberal social justice “gospel.” Emerging church journalist Jim Wallis (founder of Sojourners) is one who picked up on Bethke’s video. In an article on Wallis’ blog, it states:

Bethke’s work challenges his listeners to second guess their preconceived notions about what it means to be a Christian. He challenges us to turn away from the superficial trappings of “religion,” and instead lead a missional life in Christ.1

What the article is talking about when it says “preconceived notions” is Christianity according to the Bible. Emerging figures accept some of it but find to accept all of it is too restricting. Many of them call themselves “red letter Christians,” supposing to mean they adhere to all the red letters that Jesus said; but they have actually chosen which red letters they adhere to—they don’t accept them all. For instance, they dismiss red letters that refer to there being a hell for those who reject Jesus Christ as Lord, God, and Savior. When the word missional is used, this doesn’t mean traditional missionary efforts to evangelize the world. It means to realize that all of humanity is saved and being saved along with all of creation and that the means of salvation didn’t take place in a one-time event (the Cross) but is an ongoing procedure that occurs as people begin to realize they are all connected to one another and can bring about a Utopian society through this interconnectedness. Such emerging buzz words like missional fool a lot of people though.

Incidentally, if you’ve never read the article we posted in the summer of 2010 regarding Jim Wallis and Sojourners, “Sojourners Founder Jim Wallis’ Revolutionary Anti-Christian “Gospel” (and Will Christian Leaders Stand with Wallis?)” we highly recommend it.2 But be warned—you may find it quite disturbing when you read what the agenda behind the scenes really is.

The rally call to throw out Christianity but keep “Jesus” isn’t a new one—we’ve heard it many times before from various emerging contemplatives. Futurist Erwin McManus once said in an interview:

My goal is to destroy Christianity as a world religion and be a recatalyst for the movement of Jesus Christ . . . Some people are upset with me because it sounds like I’m anti-Christian. I think they might be right.3

And, of course, there is Dan Kimball’s book, They Like Jesus But Not the Church. In a book review of Kimball’s book, Lighthouse Trails stated that the book should really be called They Like (Another) Jesus But Not the Church, the Bible, Morality, or the Truth.4 Kimball interviews several young people (one is a lesbian) who tell him they “like and respect Jesus” but they don’t want anything to do with going to church or with those Christians who take the Bible literally. Kimball says these are “exciting times” we live in “when Jesus is becoming more and more respected in our culture by non-churchgoing people.”5 He says we should “be out listening to what non-Christians, especially those in their late teens to thirties, are saying and thinking about the church and Christianity.”6

According to Kimball, it is vitally important that we as Christians be accepted by non-Christians and not thought of as abnormal or strange. But in order to do that, he says we must change the way we live and behave. Kimball insists that “those who are rejecting faith in Jesus” do so because of their views of Christians and the church.7 But he makes it clear throughout the book that these distorted views are not the fault of the unbeliever but are the fault of Christians, but not all Christians, just those fundamentalist ones who take the Bible literally, believe that homosexuality is a sin, and think certain things are wrong and harmful to society . . . and actually speak up about these things.

Perhaps what is most damaging about Dan Kimball’s book is his black and white, either or reasoning (the very thing he accuses Christians of). He makes it very clear that you cannot be a Christian who takes the Bible literally and also be a humble, loving, thoughtful person. They are two different things, according to Kimball. There is no such thing as a loving, humble Christian who takes the Bible literally. His book further alienates believers in a world that is already hostile to those who say Jesus is the only way to salvation, the Bible should be taken literally, homosexuality is a sin, and we are called out of this world to live righteously by the grace of God.

Brian McLaren, the emerging church’s early pioneer, resonates with these ill feelings toward the Christian faith when he states:

I must add, though, that I don’t believe making disciples must equal making adherents to the Christian religion. It may be advisable in many (not all!) circumstances to help people become followers of Jesus and remain within their Buddhist, Hindu, or Jewish contexts.8

Roger Oakland deals with this “we love Jesus but hate Christianity” mentality in his book Faith Undone. Listen to a few quotes Oakland includes in that book:

For me, the beginning of sharing my faith with people began by throwing out Christianity and embracing Christian spirituality, a nonpolitical mysterious system that can be experienced but not explained.9—Don Miller, Blue Like Jazz

They [Barbarians] see Christianity as a world religion, in many ways no different from any other religious system. Whether Buddhism, Hinduism, Islam, or Christianity, they’re not about religion; they’re about advancing the revolution Jesus started two thousand years ago.10—Erwin McManus, The Barbarian Way

New Light embodiment means to be “in connection” and “information” with other faiths. . . .  One can be a faithful disciple of Jesus Christ without denying the flickers of the sacred in followers of Yahweh, or Kali, or Krishna.”11–Leonard Sweet

I happen to know people who are followers of Christ in other religions.12–Rick Warren

I see no contradiction between Buddhism and Christianity. . . . I intend to become as good a Buddhist as I can.13–Thomas Merton

Allah is not another God … we worship the same God. . . . The same God! The very same God we worship in Christ is the God . . . the Muslims–worship.14–Peter Kreeft

Roger Oakland relates a story from the Book of Acts:

“[T]he apostle Paul had been arrested for preaching the Gospel. He was brought before King Agrippa and given the opportunity to share his testimony of how he became a Christian. He told Agrippa that the Lord had commissioned him to preach the Gospel and:

To open their eyes, and to turn them from darkness to light, and from the power of Satan unto God, that they may receive forgiveness of sins, and inheritance among them which are sanctified by faith that is in me. (Acts 26:18)

“Agrippa continued listening and then said to Paul, ‘Almost thou persuadest me to be a Christian (vs. 28).’ Paul answered him:

I would to God, that not only thou, but also all that hear me this day, were both almost, and altogether such as I am, except these bonds. (vs. 29)

“If Paul had been following the emerging mentality, he would have told Agrippa, “No need to become a Christian. You can remain just as you are; keep all your rituals and practices, just say you like Jesus.” In actuality, if Paul had been practicing emerging spirituality, he wouldn’t have been arrested in the first place. He would not have stood out, would not have preached boldly and without reservation, and he would not have called himself a Christian, which eventually became a death sentence for Paul and countless others.”15

It’s hard to believe there was not at least some political agenda in this storm of “we love Jesus but not the church or Christianity” especially witnessed in election years. And we believe this agenda was aimed particularly toward young people from evangelical conservative upbringings who had joined the emerging church movement. In a CBS Broadcast, anchorman Antonio Mora suggests there may have been over twenty million participants in the emerging church movement in the United States alone by 2006.16 Even half that number would be enough to change the results of a presidential election.

Some may contend that Jefferson Bethke’s song doesn’t have any political message at all—it’s just about hypocrisy of religious people. But interestingly, in the very first few lines of the song, Bethke raps:
“What if I told you getting you to vote Republican, really wasn’t his [Jesus’] mission? Because Republican doesn’t automatically mean Christian.”

Could there be some message here that Bethke is trying to relay? Is it just to tell people that just because they are Republican doesn’t mean they are Christian? Surely not. A fourth grader could reason that out. It’s difficult not to believe there is some other message here that just happens to be taking place on an election year.

Just consider some of the things that were said by evangelical and emerging figures during the 2008 presidential election year. And think about what you are hearing today. A lot of people love the messages being sent out by people like Dan Kimball, Erwin McManus, and let’s not forget Frank Viola and George Barna’s book, Pagan Christianity, where they condemn church practices like pastors, sermons, Sunday School, and pews, but say nothing about spiritual deception that has come into the church through the contemplative prayer movement. These latter two figures (Viola and Barna) give readers a feeling that they should hate Christianity but just love Jesus. But what Jesus are these voices writing, singing, and rapping about? It may be “another Jesus” and “another gospel” (2 Corinthians 11:4).

As the world is gradually (but not too slowly anymore) heading toward a global government and global religion, it is becoming more and more apparent that this global society will be one where “tolerance” is the byword for everything other than biblical Christianity. And what better way to breed hatred toward biblical Christians than to say “we love Jesus but hate the church” (i.e., Christians and Christianity)? Perhaps they have forgotten what Jesus said:

If the world hate you, ye know that it hated me before it hated you. If ye were of the world, the world would love his own: but because ye are not of the world, but I have chosen you out of the world, therefore the world hateth you. (John 15: 18-19)

I have given them thy word; and the world hath hated them, because they are not of the world, even as I am not of the world. (John 17:14)

This report we have written may produce more questions than answers regarding things like politics, voting, the role of Christians in the world, the view the world has of Christians, and so forth. But while we have not answered such questions, we hope we have shown that indeed things are not always as they seem and that often what seems right may actually be from a deceiving angel of light and those who appear good may actually be only false ministers of righteousness.

And no marvel; for Satan himself is transformed into an angel of light. Therefore it is no great thing if his ministers also be transformed as the ministers of righteousness. (2 Corinthians 11: 14-15)

To order copies of They Hate Christianity But Love (Another) Jesus, click here.

Endnotes:
1. Matthew Santoro, “Viral: ‘Why I Hate Religion But Love Jesus’” (God’s Politics blog, January 11, 2012, http://www.sojo.net/blogs/2012/01/11/viral-why-i-hate-religion-love-jesus?quicktabs_1=2).
2. M. Danielsen, “Sojourners Founder Jim Wallis’ Revolutionary Anti-Christian “Gospel” (and Will Christian Leaders Stand with Wallis?)”  (http://www.lighthousetrailsresearch.com/blog/?p=4545).
3. “Pastor, noted author takes uncivil approach in new offering Book seeks to uproot ‘Christianity’ to return to its roots” (Christian Examiner, http://www.christianexaminer.com/Articles/Articles%20Mar05/Art_Mar05_09.html).
4. “They Like Jesus, But Not the Church (or They Like (Another) Jesus But Not the Church, the Bible, Morality, or the Truth)”  (http://www.lighthousetrailsresearch.com/blog/?p=3292).
5. Dan Kimball, They Like Jesus But Not the Church (Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 2007), p. 12.
6. Ibid.
7. Ibid., p. 19.
8. Brian McLaren, A Generous Orthodoxy ((Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 2004), p. 293.
9. Donald Miller, Blue Like Jazz (Nashville, TN: Zondervan, 2003), p. 115.
10. Erwin McManus, The Barbarian Way (Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson, 2005),p. 6.
11. Leonard Sweet, Quantum Spirituality (Dayton, OH: Whaleprints, First Edition, 1991), p. 130.
12. Rick Warren, “Discussion: Religion and Leadership,” with David Gergen and Rick Warren (Aspen Ideas Festival, The Aspen Institute, July 6, 2005, http://www.aspeninstitute.org); for more information: http://www.lighthousetrailsresearch.com/newsletternovember05.htm.
13. David Steindl-Rast, “Recollection of Thomas Merton’s Last Days in the West” (Monastic Studies, 7:10, 1969).
14. Peter Kreeft, Ecumenical Jihad (San Francisco, CA: Ignatius Press, 1996), pp. 30, 160.
15. Roger Oakland, Faith Undone (Eureka, MT: Lighthouse Trails Publishing, 2007), pp. 180-181.
16. Cited from Faith Undone, from chapter 1; taken from Antonio Mora, “New Faithful Practice Away from Churches” (CBS Broadcasting, July 10, 2006).

To order copies of They Hate Christianity But Love (Another) Jesus, click here.

Liberty Univ. Under Fire for ‘Destructive’ Counseling, Winking at Sexual Immorality on Campus

LTRP Note: Show us a Christian college that is becoming laxed in its views toward homosexuality, and we’ll show you a college that has been promoting contemplative spirituality for some time. They go hand in hand. Liberty University is just such a place.

By Heather Clark
Christian News Network

Lynchburg, Virginia – Liberty University is coming under fire following a recent essay released by a former student who shared his story of being a practicing homosexual on campus.

As previously reported, The Atlantic published an essay last week penned by former Liberty student Brandon Ambrosino, outlining his personal experience of life on campus after coming out as a homosexual.

“When people find out I underwent therapy at Jerry Falwell’s Christian college, they assume I went through something like gay reparative therapy. But that isn’t what happened,” he wrote in the piece, entitled Being Gay at Jerry Falwell’s University. “I saw two counselors at Liberty … and neither of them ever expressed an interest in ‘curing’ me. Did they have an agenda? Yes. Their goal, which they were very honest about, was to help me to like myself, and to find peace with the real Brandon.” Click here to continue reading.

Related Information:

Jonathan Falwell Becomes Vice-Chancellor at Liberty University

Mark Driscoll and Liberty University Are Good Match – Both Promote Contemplative Spirituality

Liberty University Climbs Deeper into the Contemplative/Emerging Camp

The Top 50 “Christian” Contemplative Books – A “NOT RECOMMENDED Reading List” and 25 Christian “Bridgers” to Them

LTRP Note: Ray Yungen and the editors at Lighthouse Trails have put together our Top 50 “Christian” Contemplative Books  – A “Not Recommended Reading List.” If your pastor, your professor, your children, or your friends are reading any of these books, then they are being led down a path that will take them toward a mystical, panentheistic spirituality where only deception  lies in wait. And keep in mind, if they are reading other books that are pointing to the books and authors below, this may ultimately have the same results.

Take this test to see how integrated the pro-contemplative authors below have become in the church: Pick a favorite author or teacher you follow, and ask yourself: “Does this person promote, embrace, or emulate any of the authors below?” (For example: Dallas Willard (a favorite in Christian colleges) promotes and emulates a number of the names below; Beth Moore (the top women’s Bible study teacher) strongly embraces Brennan Manning; Mark Driscoll finds much favor with Richard Foster; Dan Kimball resonates with Henri Nouwen, to name one. In fact, we have put together a list of the top 25 Christian leaders who embrace, emulate, and/or promote the authors named below. We call these 25 leaders “bridgers” because they are bridging the gap between contemplative mysticism (i.e., eastern mysticism) and the church. You can see that list of 25 below our top 50 books. Don’t get us wrong when we name just 25; there are many more than that (including lots of new upstarts), but these 25 are who we would consider the most influential and prolific today.

The Top 50 “Christian” Contemplative Books – A “NOT RECOMMENDED Reading List”

1. A World Waiting to Be Born by M. Scott Peck
2. Awakened Heart by Gerald May
3. Celebration of Discipline by Richard Foster
4. Centering Prayer and Inner Awakening by Cynthia Bourgeault
5. Centering Prayer by Basil Pennington
6. Chicken Soup for the Soul books by Jack Canfield and Mark Victor Hansen
7. Contemplative Prayer by Thomas Merton
8. Contemplative Youth Ministry by Mark Yaconelli
9. Emergence, the Rebirth of the Sacred by David Spangler
10. Emotionally Healthy Spirituality by Pete Scazzero
11. Everything Belongs: The Gift of Contemplative Prayer by Richard Rohr
12. Finding God by Ken Kaisch
13. God’s Joyful Surprise by Sue Monk Kidd
14. Invitation to Solitude and Silence: Experiencing God’s Transforming Presence by Ruth Haley Barton
15. Kundalini Energy and Christian Spirituality by Philip St. Romain
16. Lead Like Jesus by Ken Blanchard
17. Naked Spirituality by Brian McLaren
18. Open Heart, Open Mind by Thomas Keating
19. Original Blessing by Matthew Fox
20. Practicing the Presence of God by Brother Lawrence
21. Reimagining Christianity by Alan Jones
22. Sabbatical Journey by Henri Nouwen
23. Sacred Pathways by Gary Thomas
24. Sacred Way, The by Tony Jones
25. Seeds of Peace by William Shannon
26. Setting the Gospel Free by Brian C. Taylor
27. Silence on Fire by William Shannon
28. Soul Feast by Marjorie Thompson
29. Spiritual Classics by Richard Foster and Emilie Griffin
30. Spiritual Disciplines Handbook by Adele Ahlberg Calhoun
31. Spiritual Friend by Tilden Edwards
32. The Big Book of Christian Mysticism by Carl McColman
33. The Cloud of Unknowing by Anonymous Monk
34. The Coming of the Cosmic Christe by Matthew Fox
35. The Healing Light by Agnes Sanford
36. The Heart of Christianity by Marcus Borg
37. The Jesus We Never Knew by Marcus Borg
38. The Life You’ve Always Wanted by John Ortberg
39. The Mission of Mysticism by Richard Kirby
40. The Mystic Heart by Wayne Teasdale
41. The Naked Now by Richard Rohr
42. The Other Side of Silence by Morton Kelsey
43. The Papa Prayer: The Prayer You’ve Never Prayed by Larry Crabb
44. The Purpose Driven Life by Rick Warren
45. The Signature of Jesus by Brennan Manning
46. The Way of the Heart by Henri Nouwen
47. The God of Intimacy and Action: Reconnecting Ancient Spiritual Practices, Evangelism, and Justice by Tony Campolo
48. The Soul at Rest by Tricia Rhodes
49. When the Heart Waits by Sue Monk Kidd
50. When the Soul Listens by Jan Johnson

Top 25 Christian Leaders Who Embrace, Emulate, and/or Promote Contemplative Mystics

1. Ann Voskamp
2. Anne Lamott
3. Beth Moore
4. Bill Hull
5. Bill Hybels
6. Calvin Miller
7. Dallas Willard
8. Dan Kimball
9. David Benner
10. Donald Miller
11. Doug Pagitt
12. Eugene Peterson
13. J.P. Moreland
14. Jim Wallis
15. John Eldredge
16. Ken Boa
17. Keri Wyatt Kent
18. Leonard Sweet
19. Mark Driscoll
20. Mike Bickle
21. Philip Yancey
22. Rob Bell
23. Robert Webber
24. Shane Claiborne
25. Walter Brueggemann


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