Posts Tagged ‘halloween’

NEW BOOKLET: HALLOWEEN! A Warning to Christian Parents

NEW BOOKLET:HALLOWEEN! A Warning to Christian Parents by Johanna Michaelsen is our newest Lighthouse Trails Booklet Tract.  The Booklet is 16 pages long and sells for $1.95 for single copies. Quantity discounts are as much as 50% off retail. Our Booklets are designed to give away to others or for your own personal use. Below is the content of the booklet. To order copies of HALLOWEEN! A Warning to Christian Parents, click here. 

Halloween! A Warning to Christian Parents

By Johanna Michaelsen

It was the night of Halloween, and ironically, I was working on a chapter about Halloween for my book Like Lambs to the Slaughter: Your Child and the Occult when the doorbell rang. I was greeted by an adorable bunch of little kids doing their level best to look like gruesome Witches and vampires. I bent down as I distributed apples and oranges in response to lusty cries of “trick or treat!”

“You kids want to know something?” I asked very softly.

“Yeah!” came a unanimous chorus.

“With the Lord Jesus, there is no trick. He loves every one of you very much.”

Several little faces beamed up at me through their ghoulish makeup. “That’s neat!” exclaimed one little girl. “Yeah!” chimed in a few others.

“This is Jesus’ night,” I said. Why I said that, I’m not really sure. I was poignantly aware of the fact that it is a night the devil has made a point of claiming for himself.

“No it’s not!” snarled a hidden voice. “It’s Jason’s night!” A boy who was taller than the rest stepped out from the shadows. He was wearing the white hockey mask of “Jason,” the demented, ghoulish killer in the movie Friday the 13th and was brandishing a very realistic-looking hatchet. I have to admit that the boy gave me a start, but I stood my ground and dropped a banana into his bag.

“No, ‘Jason,’ this is still Jesus’ night!” I repeated. And indeed it is, even though it is most assuredly the night set aside for the glorification and worship of idols, false gods, Satan, and death. “For this purpose the Son of God was manifested, that He might destroy the works of the devil.”1

“Jason” evidently resented the competition, however, for he ripped our mailbox right out of the ground and left his banana squished on the stair.

PET GHOSTS?

Most of us in the United States have grown up observing Halloween in one form or another. From the time we are in preschool, we make drawings or cutouts of sinister black Witches—the haggier the better. We make paintings of gruesome black cats with gleaming, evil, orange eyes; we hang up smirking paper skeletons with dancing limbs; we glue together ghost and bat mobiles; and we design demoniacal faces for our pumpkins.

For several years, one thoughtful kindergarten teacher in Southern California even provided ghosts for her pupils to commune with at Halloween. I spoke with one of the mothers from that school who told me that her little boy was sent home with a note from the teacher informing the parents that their child would be bringing home a “special friend” the next day. The child was to nurture his “friend,” name it, feed it, and talk to it—all as a part of a special class project that was designed to “develop the child’s imagination.”

The next day, the little boy came home with a sealed envelope along with explicit instructions that his parents were not to touch it; only the child was allowed to open the envelope. Mom said, “You bet!” and promptly opened it up. Inside was six inches of thick orange wool string with a knot tied a quarter of the way up to make a loop resembling a head. The mimeographed “letter” that accompanied it read as follows:

Haunted House
001 Cemetery Lane
Spookville

Dear Customer,

Thank you for your order. Your ghost is exactly what you ordered. You will find that your ghost is attached to an orange string. Do not untie the special knot until you are ready to let your ghost go.

Your ghost will tell you when it is hungry and what it prefers to eat. It will sleep in the air beside you all day. It especially likes quiet places where there are cobwebs, creaky boards and corners.

If you follow the above directions, you will have a very happy ghost.

Yours truly,

Head Ghost

The mother, a Christian, didn’t approve of the idea of her son taking in a pet ghost, however housebroken. She was also a little suspicious of her six-year-old being addressed as “Dear Customer.” So she confiscated the thing and put it in the garage on a shelf until she could decide what to do with it. The next day, her sister was in the garage on an errand, unaware of the matter of the “ghost in the string.” Suddenly she was frightened by the sense of a threatening presence around her. She heard the sounds of a cat hissing in the corner and something like a “chatty doll” mumbling incoherently at her. Later that night they threw the “ghost string” into the garbage pail, prayed to bind and remove the entity, and were never bothered by the “presence” again. This family had no trouble whatever believing that a spirit had indeed been sent home with their little boy and that it didn’t much like having been assigned to a Christian household.2

The Halloween ghosts were given out again the following year by the same teacher. The Christian mother managed to get hold of the envelope, orange ghost-carrier and all, and sent it to me. It is possible, of course, that the teacher meant nothing sinister by it. Perhaps to her it was just a cute exercise in imagination for her kindergartners. Nevertheless, in light of the stated intent of many Transpersonal (i.e., a branch of psychology that focuses on mysticism and the occult in the search for transcendence) educators to introduce children to spirit guides, I can’t help but be a little curious about any teacher who sends the children home with “imaginary friends.”

CHURCH-SPONSORED HORROR

Even in the church, Halloween is a time of spooky fun and games. Any number of evangelical churches, ever mindful of their youth programs and ministries, will sponsor haunted houses designed to scare the wits out of the kids. From 1970 to 2001 in Bakersfield, California, Youth for Christ’s Campus Life was a co-sponsor of “Scream in the Dark,” an event that was held every night for about a week before Halloween. At least 20,000 people “brave[d] the chilly corridors and dark passages” every year to face ghoulish figures, terrifying tunnels, and screams in the dark.3

While many churches have switched from Halloween activities to alternative events on Halloween such as Harvest parties, countless Christians still allow their children to celebrate Halloween with door-to-door trick or treating and dressing up in scary costumes. Christian actor Kirk Cameron (Left Behind films and Fireproof) has come out publicly defending Halloween. In an interview in a popular online Christian magazine, Cameron stated that Christians “should have the biggest Halloween party on your block.” Cameron said he had no problem with Christians dressing up in devil, ghost, and other traditional Halloween costumes because they could do it as a way to witness to unbelievers.4

But is this church-sponsored horror a good idea? There are a number of reasons it is not. For one thing, terror can kill. When my husband was a teenager, the family next door to him lost their toddler one Halloween when the little one opened the door to trick-or-treaters. Their hideous appearance and shrieks so traumatized the child that he literally dropped dead on the spot. That may be a rare example, but the fact remains that terrorizing children is dangerous.

Church-sponsored horror isn’t a new phenomenon. My husband’s Lutheran church in New York always sponsored a “Chamber of Horrors” when he was a boy, complete with fluorescent skeletons, scary pop-ups, peeled grapes to simulate dead eyeballs, and a bowl of cold spaghetti that was supposed to be . . . well, you know. Anyway, they made you stick your hand into it, and any number of kids spent the rest of the night throwing up.

Halloween has become a full-fledged national children’s play day, but for hundreds of thousands of people in the Western world (and their numbers are growing steadily) Halloween is a sacred time, the ancient pagan festival of fire and death.

FESTIVAL OF THE DEAD

The origins and traditions of Halloween can be traced back thousands of years to the days of the ancient Celts and their priests, the Druids. The eve of October 31 marked the transition from summer into the darkness of winter. It marked the beginning of the Celtic New Year. The Feast of Samhain was a fearsome night, a dreaded night, a night in which great bonfires were lit, according to some pagan traditions, to Samana the Lord of Death, the dark Aryan god who was known as the Grim Reaper, the leader of the ancestral ghosts.5

On this night, the spirits of the dead rose up, shivering with the coming cold of winter and seeking the warmth and affection of the homes they once inhabited. And even colder, darker creatures filled the night: evil Witches flying through the night,6 hobgoblins, and evil pookas that appeared in the form of hideous black horses. Demons, fairies, and ghouls roamed about as the doors of the burial sidh-mounds opened wide,7 allowing them free access to the world of living men. These loathsome beings were usually not in a particularly good mood by the time they arrived, and it was feared that unless these spirits were appeased and soothed with offerings and gifts they would wreak mischief and vengeance by destroying crops, killing cattle, turning milk sour, and generally making life miserable.

So it was that families offered what was most precious to them: food—a “treat” which they fervently hoped would be sufficient to offset any “trick” which the ghostly blackmailers might otherwise be tempted to inflict.

The ancient Celtic villagers realized, however, that merely feeding the spirits might not be enough to speed them on their way. The ghoulies might decide it would be rude to eat and run, as it were, and might just be tempted to stick around.

That simply would not do. So arose the practice of dressing in masks and costumes: Chosen villagers disguised themselves as the fell creatures at large, mystically taking on their attributes and powers. The “mummers,” as they were called, cavorted from house to house collecting the ancient Celtic equivalent of protection money, and then romped the ghosts right out of town when they were through.

They carried jack-o’-lanterns to light their way—turnips or potatoes with fearful, demonic faces carved into them which they hoped would duly impress, if not intimidate, the demons around them.8

SACRIFICE AND FIRE

As a part of their ancient New Year’s ritual, massive sacred bonfires were lit throughout the countryside of Wales, Ireland, and France—fires from which every house in the village would rekindle their hearth fires (which had been ritually extinguished, as they were at the end of every year). The villagers would gather and dance round and round the bonfire, whose light and heat they believed would help the sun make it through the cold, dark winter.9

But the great fires served another purpose as well: On this night, unspeakable sacrifices were offered by the Druid priests to the Lord of Death. Lewis Spence in his book The History and Origins of Druidism says:

Certain writers on Celtic history have indignantly denied that the Druidic caste ever practiced the horrible rite of human sacrifice. There is no question, however, that practice it they did. Tacitus alludes to the fact that the Druids of Anglesea “covered their altars with the blood of captives.” If the words of Caesar are to be credited, human sacrifice was a frequent and common element in their religious procedure. He tells us that no sacrifice might be carried out except in the presence of a Druid.10

It is in his Commentaries that Caesar speaks of the great wicker images “in which the Druids were said to burn scores of people alive.”11

Some modem Witches may still deny that the Druidic religion, on which many of their beliefs and practices are based, ever practiced human and animal sacrifice as a part of their “peaceable nature religion.” But some noted Witches have indeed acknowledged the murderous bent of the ancient religion:

Propitiation, in the old days when survival was felt to depend on it, was a grim and serious affair. There can be little doubt that at one time it involved human sacrifice—of criminals saved up for the purpose or, at the other end of the scale, of an aging king; little doubt, either, that these ritual deaths were by fire.12

The Druids (from the Gaelic word druidh, meaning “a wise man” or “magician”13) would carefully watch the writhing of the victims in the fire (whether people or animals) and from their death agonies would foretell the future of the village. The Feast of Samhain was by no means the only celebration at which the Druids practiced human sacrifice. Sacrificial victims were also burned in their sacred fires during the spring festival of Beltane held on the eve of the first of May as part of their fertility rites.14 So it would seem, according to ancient historians, that human and animal sacrifice was a particularly noxious and pervasive habit among the Druids.

The Farrars, well-known authors and practicing Witches in Ireland, tell us that “Later, of course, the propitiatory sacrifice became symbolic . . .” but then mention that the royal sacrifice at Samhain may have lingered in the form of animal substitutes. The Farrars tell us of at least one animal sacrifice they knew of that took place in their village “within living memory.”15 We can only hope that “the old days when survival was felt to depend on human sacrifice” will never return.

THE SPIRIT OF HALLOWEEN

One Halloween several years ago, I watched a rerun of Garfield’s Halloween Adventure. Garfield was thrilled at the realization that Halloween was a night where he got to rake in free candy. “This is the night I was created for,” he exclaimed with as much enthusiasm as Garfield ever seems to muster.

He decides to sucker poor unsuspecting Otie, an exceedingly dumb (though endearing) doggie, into going with him so that Garfield could double his personal candy haul. Well . . . maybe he’ll give Otie one piece of candy for his troubles.

Then suddenly Garfield pauses in his Machiavellian musings and wonders, “Am I being too greedy? Should I share my candy with those less fortunate than I? Am I missing the spirit of Halloween?” Wouldn’t it be nice if that were in fact the spirit of Halloween! But nothing could be further from the truth.

The “spirit of Halloween” is more accurately discerned in the horror movies and DVDs traditionally released in honor of the season.16 Popular cinematic “treasures” like Halloween (and its three sequels), Friday the 13th (three of those), Halloweennight, Tale of Halloween, and any number of slasher, blood-and-gore, murder- and-terror flicks are truer to the original “spirit of Halloween”—the spirit of sudden death and murder—than is the sight of little Linus sitting all night in his “sincere” pumpkin patch waiting for the Great Pumpkin, or of Garfield in his relentless quest for candy.

SPIRITED COMMUNION

Modern Witches would vehemently deny that their celebration has anything to do with the demonic horrors depicted in such films as Friday the 13th. To them, Halloween is one of the four greater Sabbats held during the year. It is the time of Harvest Celebration—that season in which the Great Goddess goes to sleep for the long winter months, giving way to the Horned God of Hunting and Death, who will rule until her return on the first of May. It is a time of ritual and for ridding oneself of personal weaknesses,17 a time for feasting and joyful celebration. It is also a time for communing with the spirits of the dead.

Witches Arnold and Patricia Crowther say that—

Halloween has always been the Festival of the Dead and was believed to be the best time to contact those who had passed over. Today, spiritualists try to contact the departed by means of “spirit guides”—American Indians, Chinese men, nuns, priests and even little girls. Witches tried to make contact through the god of Death himself. So when the bonfire had burned down, the priestess, in her new role as the god, held a skull between her hands, using it as a crystal-gazing ball. This was the kind of necromancy practiced centuries before the Fox Sisters, with their poltergeist tappings, started the modern craze for spiritualism.18

The Celts, say the Crowthers, would sometimes lie on graves during Halloween, hoping to hear some word of wisdom from the spirits of the corpses beneath them. And the Crowthers boast that “the high priestesses were just as successful in contacting the dead as are our own mediums.”19 According to a longtime Witch with whom I once spoke, they still are. Communing with the spirits of the dead is a regular feature of their covens’ Halloween rituals.

Several years ago, an article in the Los Angeles Times featured a story on a certain coven’s celebration rituals during Halloween. The story described the ritual and then told that it “will be repeated throughout the Southland today as Witches celebrate their most important holiday, Samhain, or Halloween, when they believe the veil between the worlds becomes thin, making visits with spirits possible.” Some Witches will use the Ouija board to contact the dead. Others will use a darkened scrying-mirror into which they stare until the faces of their beloved departed supposedly appear. Others may use a crystal ball or “sit quietly round the cauldron, gazing into the incense smoke, talking of what they see and feel.”20

SATANIC REVELS

While the Witches are spending the Halloween season tucking in their Goddess for her long winter sleep and frolicking in joyful communion with the spirits of the dead, there is another religious group that is equally serious about its Halloween celebrations: the Satanists. Halloween to them is a more sinister and direct celebration of death and Satan. Unlike the Witches, of whom most do not even acknowledge the existence of Satan, the Satanists are quite candid about exactly who the dread “lord of death” happens to be, and they celebrate Halloween as one of his two highest unholy days.

As is the case among the Witches, different “denominations” of Satanists have their own peculiar traditions, beliefs, and practices on this night. For some of them Satan is not a real, specific entity but rather the personification of evil resident within all men, a “dark hidden force in nature responsible for the workings of earthly affairs.”21

Other Satanists however—cult Satanists—understand that Satan is very real indeed. To them, the sacrifices he demands are not symbolic at all.22 They believe that the blood sacrifice of innocence which Satan demands as the ultimate blasphemy and sign of devotion to himself must be very literal indeed. At various times during the year, but especially during the month of October, police across the country report finding the remains of animals—some with the blood drained, others with various organs missing, some carefully skinned while keeping the tortured creature alive. They are frequently found at sites which indicate that some form of ritual took place. When no altar or pentagram or other symbolism is in evidence, it is entirely likely that some neophyte or self-styled Satanist is simply practicing to make sure the “sacrifice” is letter-perfect for the ceremony.

Because of its innocence and frailty, a tiny child is viewed by these Satanists as the perfect sacrifice to their Master. The infant is seen as a representation of the Christ Child, and it is He whom they are blaspheming and symbolically destroying in the prolonged and brutal torture and slaying of the child. After the death of the baby, the members will all eat a portion of the little one’s heart and will drink its blood.

RECRUITERS FOR SATAN

Halloween is also a prime recruiting season for the Satanists. Much as the government will plant undercover narcotic agents in various high schools to find out who is pushing or using drugs on campus, so some Satanists may plant kids at the schools who are there solely for the purpose of discerning potential members or victims among the students. The Dungeons and Dragons clubs are key hunting grounds for them, as are other groups and clubs based on medieval themes.

Church-sponsored “haunted houses” are also fertile recruiting centers. The Satanists watch for those kids who show a marked bent for the macabre and the sinister, and they invite them to a “real good” party being held elsewhere, which proves to be a lower-level ritual held for the purpose of initiating these kids into Satanism.

IMITATORS OF GOD

So . . . should your family participate in the traditional Halloween celebrations? Absolutely . . . if you and/or your children are Witches, Satanists, humanists, atheists, pagans, or anything other than born-again Christians (or Orthodox Jews). For a true Christian to participate in the ancient trappings of Halloween is as incongruous as for a committed cult Satanist coming from a blood sacrifice on Christmas Eve to set up a crèche in his living room and sing “Silent Night, Holy Night” with heartfelt, sincere devotion to baby Jesus.

Ephesians 5:1 admonishes us to be imitators of God. Can you picture the Lord Jesus dressing up as Satan, or as one of the demons He cast out that week, or perhaps as a Druid priest, just because it was the Feast of Samhain and His disciples were giving a nifty party that night in honor of the tradition? Or can you see the apostles disguising themselves as temple prostitutes or as worshipers of the god Moloch, to whom the Canaanites (and even the Israelites in their darker days) sacrificed their children?23

Halloween is a day in which virtually every occult practice that God has called “abomination” is glorified.

When you come into the land which the Lord your God is giving you, you shall not learn to follow the abominations of those nations. There shall not be found among you anyone who makes his son or his daughter pass through the fire, or one who practices witchcraft, or a soothsayer, or one who interprets omens, or a sorcerer, or one who conjures spells, or a medium, or a spiritist, or one who calls up the dead.  For all who do these things are an abomination to the Lord, and because of these abominations the Lord your God drives them out from before you. You shall be blameless before the Lord your God. For these nations which you will dispossess listened to soothsayers and diviners; but as for you, the Lord your God has not appointed such for you. (Deuteronomy 18:9-14, NASB*)

“But it’s only for one night!” some cry. “It’s only in fun for the children!” If this is how you feel, then you need to understand what the Word of God says to you:

Learn not the way of the heathen! (Jeremiah 10:2)

Be ye not unequally yoked together with unbelievers: for what fellowship hath righteousness with unrighteousness? and what communion hath light with darkness? and what concord hath Christ with Belial? or what part hath he that believeth with an infidel? and what agreement hath the temple of God with idols? for ye are the temple of the living God; as God hath said, I will dwell in them, and walk in them; and I will be their God, and they shall be my people. Wherefore come out from among them, and be ye separate, saith the Lord, and touch not the unclean thing; and I will receive you. (2 Corinthians 6:14-17)

But I say, that the things which the Gentiles sacrifice, they sacrifice to devils, and not to God: and I would not that ye should have fellowship with devils. Ye cannot drink the cup of the Lord, and the cup of devils: ye cannot be partakers of the Lord’s table, and of the table of devils. (1 Corinthians 10:20-21)

CREATIVE ALTERNATIVES

There are any number of creative alternatives that can be provided for children on Halloween without participating in the ancient religious traditions of the Witches and Satanists.

Some families view the occasion as a witnessing opportunity and handout Gospel tracts along with the treats. Some churches are now sponsoring “Bible Houses,” in which the kids go through and hear different Bible stories read or acted out—a godly alternative to the haunted-house routine!

Other Christian families choose to spend the night remembering the saints who have gone to be with the Lord during the year. Saints aren’t just those who have been canonized as such by some church. A saint, according to the Bible, is anyone who has believed in the Lord Jesus Christ as his personal Messiah. Perhaps you could spend this night talking about the martyrs who were willing to die rather than compromise their belief in the Lord Jesus Christ.

Christian parents can also make a difference in the way the schools their children attend celebrate Halloween. In Colorado, parents protested the traditional celebration of Halloween in several public schools, including at least one elementary school on the grounds that it is a “high holy day in the satanic religion, and as such is an inappropriate holiday for schoolchildren.”24 One mother said that she “would like to see the same measures applied to the Halloween parties as have been taken with the Christmas parties.”25 In light of the present distress, I fully agree. Since God and Jesus have been banned from Christmas, Easter, and Thanksgiving celebrations in most of our schools, why should the government-recognized religions of Witchcraft and Satanism get free promotion on Halloween from these same institutions?

One thing Halloween should not be for the Christian is a time of fear. It should be a time to rejoice in the fact that “For this purpose the Son of God was manifested, that he might destroy the works of the devil” (1 John 3:8)! Spend at least part of this night worshiping God by singing hymns. Above all, spend time in prayer and intercession for the children.

It is tragic that many people in the church have forgotten that “God hath not given us the spirit of fear; but of power and of love and of a sound mind” (2 Timothy 1:7), and that includes on Halloween! Too many of our children have been made vulnerable to a spirit of fear and to the occult where we allow faith in God to be extinguished by participating in the darkness of this world.

After the repeal of the Witchcraft Act in England in 1951, the Witches and Satanists experienced a revival which is currently in full swing. You might not know too much about Witches or Satanists, but I guarantee you that most kids do in today’s computerized, Internet, social-media world.

For ye were sometimes [formerly] darkness, but now are ye light in the Lord: walk as children of light . . . And have no fellowship with the unfruitful works of darkness, but rather reprove [expose] them. (Ephesians 5:8,11)

To order copies of HALLOWEEN! A Warning to Christian Parents, click here. 

Endnotes
1. 1 John 3:8.
2. Back in 1985, there was an outfit that called itself “Adopt-a-Ghost” based in Hollywood, California. For a paltry $10.00 to cover adoption papers and conjuring fees, you could adopt a ghost for your house, condo, apartment, or office . . . like a Cabbage Patch Kid, only cheaper and considerably livelier. Hauntings were guaranteed, and the ghost even came with written tips on ghost-raising to make sure it would stick around.
3. Connie Swart, “Event Still a Scream,” the Bakersfield Californian, October 16,1982, p. 13.
4. Emma Koonse, “Kirk Cameron on Halloween: ‘Christians Should Have the Biggest Party on the Block’” (Christian Post, October 20, 2014,  http://www.christianpost.com/news/kirk-cameron-on-halloween-christians-should-have-the-biggest-party-on-the-block-128345/#Jx3ZzPQLf0A8bigp.99).
5. Barbara G. Walker, The Woman’s Encyclopedia of Myths and Secrets (San Francisco, CA: Harper and Row Publishers, 1983), p. 372.
6. Encyclopedia of Witchcraft and Demonology (London: Octopus Books Ltd., 1974), p. 166. Introduction by Hans Holzer.
7. Janet and Stewart Farrar, A Witches Bible, vol.1, The Sabbats (New York, NY: Magickal Childe Publishing, Inc., 1981, 1984), p. 122.
8. The lantern was also called a “corpse lantern” or”fairie fire,” or a will-o’-the-wisp, and numerous fascinating legends about its origins have risen up around it. Some thought it was the spirit of a child which had been buried in the swamp. Others thought it represented the lights fairies used to beckon fools to watery death in the swamps. Another legend tells of a clever fellow named Jack who got himself barred from hell as well as heaven for being something of a Faustian smart aleck and was doomed to run about earth for all eternity with the burning coal he snatched from hell itself with the turnip he was eating just before the gates slammed shut. This story makes little sense to me at all. I mean, would you be eating a turnip while standing at the gates of hell politely requesting admittance? Doubtful. One version of this tale found in an elementary school teacher’s “Halloween Fun” manual observes that the devil threw the burning coal at Jack to drive him away and that Jack caught the thing in his turnip. This makes more sense. Anyway, the Celts carved jack’o’lanterns out of turnips, nonetheless. They probably used turnips because they didn’t have pumpkins. They had to come to America to discover them, which they did during the mass immigration to America during the great potato famine of 1886. They soon realized that pumpkins are a whole lot easier to carve than turnips. They also make nicer pies.
St. James Church in the Los Angeles area held a “Pumpkin Mass” in 1987 in which the priest blessed the parishioners’ Halloween costumes (to be brought in boxes or sacks) and the pumpkins which were to be carved and placed in the sanctuary. The verse quoted for the occasion: “Ye are the light of the world. . . . Let your light so shine before men” (Matthew 5:14, 16).
9. Encyclopedia of Witchcraft, p.166.
10. Lewis Spence, The History of Origins of Druidism (Great Britain: EP Publishing Ltd., 1976), p. 104.
11. Ibid.
12. Farrar and Farrar, A Witches Bible, vol. 1 The Sabbats, op. cit., p. 122.
13. Raymond Buckland, Witchcraft from the Inside (St. Paul, MN: Llewellyn Publications, 1975), p. 16.
14. Lewis Spence, The History of Origins, op. cit., p. 105.
15. Farrar and Farrar, A Witches Bible, vol. 1, The Sabbats, op. cit., p. 122.
16. James Frazer records in The Golden Bough (New York, NY: Macmillan Publishing Co., Inc., 1922) that in some areas “people who assisted at the bonfires would wait till the last spark was out and then would suddenly take to their heels, shouting at the top of their voices, “The cropped black sow seize the hindmost!” The saying implies that originally one of the company became a victim in dead earnest” (The Golden Bough, p. 736). The “cropped black sow” was a representation of the Goddess Cerridwen in her dark aspect as the Crone, according to Welsh mythology (A Witches Bible, vol.1, The Sabbats, p. 125). She is still worshiped in that aspect by Wiccans today, as well as in her more appealing forms of Maiden and Mother.
As the Farrars point out in A Witches Bible, vol. 1, The Sabbats, p. 725), “All these victim-choosing rituals long ago mellowed into a mere romp, but Frazer had no doubt of their original grim purpose. What was once a deadly serious ritual at the great tribal fire had become a party game at the family ones.” They may have “mellowed in time,” in most places, but nevertheless, it was the terror of the original sacrifices and demons that most accurately represents the “true spirit” of Halloween. The true “spirit of Halloween” is that of sudden death and murder.
17. Raymond Buckland, Buckland’s Complete Book of Witchcraft (St. Paul, MN: Llewellyn Publications, 1986), p. 68.
18. Arnold and Patricia Crowther, The Secrets of Ancient Witchcraft with the Witches Tarot (West Caldwell, NJ: University Books, Inc., 1974), pp. 67-68.
19. Ibid., p. 68.
20. Farrar and Farrar, A Witches Bible, vol 1, The Sabbats, op. cit., p. 135.
21. Anton Szandor LaVey, The Satanic Bible (New York, NY: Avon Books, 1969), p. v of introduction.
22. Anton LaVey clarifies his position on human sacrifice on page 88 of his Satanic Bible, in which he says: “Symbolically, the victim is destroyed through the working of a hex or curse, which in turn leads to the physical, mental or emotional destruction of the ‘sacrifice’ in ways and means not attributable to the magician. The only time a Satanist would perform a human sacrifice would be if it were to serve a two-fold purpose; that being to release the magician’s wrath in the throwing of a curse, and more important, to dispose of a totally obnoxious and deserving individual.”
23. Ezekiel 16:20,21; Jeremiah 32:35; 2 Kings 17:17; Isaiah 57:5.
24 Rebecca Jones, “Halloween Parade Off” (The Eagle Forum, vol.8, no.4, Fall 1982), p. 17.
25. Ibid.

*Scripture verses in this booklet are taken from the King James Bible, except on page 14 where one verse is taken from the NASB. Scripture taken from the New American Stanard Bible(R), Copyright (C) 1960, 1962,1963,1968,1971,1972,1973,1975, 1977,1995 by The Lockman Foundation. Used by permission.

To order copies of HALLOWEEN! A Warning to Christian Parents, click here. 

About the Author

Johanna Michaelsen is a noted author, lecturer, and authority on the occult. Her internationally best-selling autobiography, The Beautiful Side of Evil, tells the story of her involvement with the occult, Yoga, Silva Mind Control, a well-known psychic surgeon in Mexico City, and her eventual rejections of all such practices. Published by Harvest House in 1982, it has been translated into German, Dutch, French, Indonesian, Bulgarian, Polish, Chinese, Portuguese, Korean, and Spanish.

Her second book Like Lambs to the Slaughter: Your Child and the Occult (available through Amazon), also a best seller, clearly and extensively documents the invasion of occultism and dangerous religious practices into America’s public education system, movies, television, books, games, holidays, and more.

Since Johanna Michaelsen’s exit from the occult in November of 1972, she has devoted her time to studying current trends and occult practices for the purpose of warning and equipping the church in these last days. Her books, tapes, audio-book, seminars, and lectures have helped thousands find freedom and peace in Jesus Christ.

Johanna is available for interviews and seminars and can be reached at Johanna@michaelsenministries.org. You may visit her on the web at: http://michaelsenministries.com.

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A Commentary to Consider: The Celebration of Halloween

used with permission from bigstockphoto.com

used with permission from bigstockphoto.com

By Judith Ritchie
Free-lance writer
A Commentary

Summer has ended and winter is fast approaching. For those of us in this modern society, we tend to forget that this is harvest time and that our very lives depend upon a good harvest to get us through this next year. But in every culture throughout the world, the time of harvest has always been crucial to their survival.

In the early days in America, the settlers prayed throughout the winter for good weather for planting, plenty of sun and rain during the growing season, and for a good harvest in the autumn. Many prayed to the Christian God of the Bible, leaving their care and future in His hands. But throughout the history of the world, most people sought help from other gods; gods who demanded much more than just faith and prayer from the people.

Halloween, known in ancient Briton and Ireland as Samhain* (“Summer’s End”), is a time of worship to the ancient god Cromm Cruaich, also known as the “Bloody Crescent.”**  Unlike the God of the Bible, Cromm Cruaich did not accept simple prayers of faith for a good harvest; he demanded much more. Charles Squire records in his book Celtic Myth and Legend, an ancient poem concerning the god Cromm Cruaich.  Here are some excerpts from it:

“Here used to be

A high idol with many fights, which was named the Cromm Cruaich;

It made every tribe to be without peace.

“T was a sad evil!

Brave Gaels used to worship it…

“He was their god,

The withered Cromm with many mists…

“To him without glory

They would kill their piteous, wretched offspring

With much wailing and peril,

To pour their blood around CrommCruaich

“Milk and corn

They would ask from him speedily

In return for one-third of their healthy issue; [their children]

Great was the horror and the scare of him…

“To him

“They did evil…”

Cromm Cruaich demanded human sacrifice. He was a demonic, bloodthirsty god described as being “withered,” cloaked in darkness by “many mists,” and whose violence terrified the people. He was merciless, evil and brought much sadness, making everyone “to be without peace.” His sacrifices were on the “high places” and under the cloak of darkness. Children and adults were sacrificed to him and to the twelve lesser gods, which were represented by “standing stones” that were placed in a circle around his golden idol. Multitudes were sacrificed all at once. Charles Squire explains, “The same authority also tells us that these sacrifices were made at ‘Hallowe’en’, [or] ‘Samhain’-“Summer’s End”- when the sun’s power waned, and the strength of the gods of darkness, winter, and the underworld grew great.” Later, St. Patrick took a sledge hammer and destroyed the golden idol of Cromm Cruaich.  This, then, is the origin of Halloween.

Unfortunately, we still honor this ancient celebration. And as we acknowledge and celebrate it, we are giving honor to a god who demanded the lives and blood of human beings. We are celebrating death, destruction, darkness, demons, violence, hatred, and evil. We are honoring a demon-god who used terror to control the people and whose demands caused strong, brave men to disgrace themselves.

In contrast, Jesus demands nothing from us but asks us to trust Him. He doesn’t demand the lives of our children to appease Him. The only thing that pleases Him is our faith. He is not a God of darkness, but rather Jesus Himself is light. He is a God of love, not fear; of healing and restoration, not violence and destruction. Jesus gives comfort, not terror, to those who look to Him for help. The early settlers who prayed to Him rested in His peace, as we do today, for He is the Prince of Peace. Jesus is the God and Creator of Life, not death. Since there is no evil in Jesus, He never brings harm or disgrace to those who worship Him, and He does not intimidate or deal unjustly. And where Cromm Cruaich is a demon-god, Jesus is holy, righteous, and pure.

The celebration of Halloween is quite obviously a celebration of darkness, death, fear, demons, hatred, violence, and evil. And yet, it’s one of the biggest celebrations of the year. What’s worse, without any thought to what they’re doing, many Christians celebrate it as well.

It is interesting to note that the writers of the ancient Celtic poem referred to Comm Cruaich as having “many mists.” In the same way, 2 Peter 2:17 speaks of those who have turned away from God as “…springs without water and mists driven by a storm, for whom the black darkness has been reserved forever.” This is the god of Halloween. This is whom we choose to ‘agree with’ when we participate, in any way at all, in this celebration.

God equates our relationship with Him to that of a marriage relationship. Many times in the Old Testament He accuses the nation of Israel of adultery and harlotry because of their involvement with spiritual practices other than those He has ordained. The prophet Isaiah pleads with Israel, “Come, house of Jacob, and let us walk in the light of the Lord.” But in the next verse, God tells them that He has abandoned them “because they are filled with influences from the east.” Is. 2:5-6

We know that God is the same yesterday, today, and forever and in the New Testament God continues to speak the same to us today:

 Do not be partakers with them; for you were formally darkness, but now you are Light in the Lord; walk as children of Light…do not participate in the unfruitful deeds of darkness, but instead, even expose them; for it is disgraceful even to speak of the things done by them in secret…therefore be careful how you walk, not as unwise men, but as wise, making the most of your time, because the days are evil. Eph. 5: 7-8, 11, 15-16

 

* Celtic Myth and Legend by Charles Squire

** Celtic Myths and Legends by T.W. Rolleston

——————————————–

Written by Judith Ritchie (c) 2011

Related Articles:

Harry Potter and the Superconsciousness by Ray Yungen

Movie/Book Warning: A warning concerning Stephanie Myer’s best-seller: Twilight by Berit Kjos

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A Commentary to Consider: The Celebration of Halloween

By Judith Ritchie
Free-lance writer
A Commentary

Summer has ended and winter is fast approaching. For those of us in this modern society, we tend to forget that this is harvest time and that our very lives depend upon a good harvest to get us through this next year. But in every culture throughout the world, the time of harvest has always been crucial to their survival.

In the early days in America, the settlers prayed throughout the winter for good weather for planting, plenty of sun and rain during the growing season, and for a good harvest in the autumn. Many prayed to the Christian God of the Bible, leaving their care and future in His hands. But throughout the history of the world, most people sought help from other gods; gods who demanded much more than just faith and prayer from the people.

Halloween, known in ancient Briton and Ireland as Samhain* (“Summer’s End”), is a time of worship to the ancient god Cromm Cruaich, also known as the “Bloody Crescent.”**  Unlike the God of the Bible, Cromm Cruaich did not accept simple prayers of faith for a good harvest; he demanded much more. Charles Squire records in his book Celtic Myth and Legend, an ancient poem concerning the god Cromm Cruaich.  Here are some excerpts from it:

“Here used to be

A high idol with many fights, which was named the Cromm Cruaich;

It made every tribe to be without peace.

“T was a sad evil!

Brave Gaels used to worship it…

“He was their god,

The withered Cromm with many mists…

“To him without glory

They would kill their piteous, wretched offspring

With much wailing and peril,

To pour their blood around CrommCruaich

“Milk and corn

They would ask from him speedily

In return for one-third of their healthy issue; [their children]

Great was the horror and the scare of him…

“To him

“They did evil…”

Cromm Cruaich demanded human sacrifice. He was a demonic, bloodthirsty god described as being “withered,” cloaked in darkness by “many mists,” and whose violence terrified the people. He was merciless, evil and brought much sadness, making everyone “to be without peace.” His sacrifices were on the “high places” and under the cloak of darkness. Children and adults were sacrificed to him and to the twelve lesser gods, which were represented by “standing stones” that were placed in a circle around his golden idol. Multitudes were sacrificed all at once. Charles Squire explains, “The same authority also tells us that these sacrifices were made at ‘Hallowe’en’, [or] ‘Samhain’-“Summer’s End”- when the sun’s power waned, and the strength of the gods of darkness, winter, and the underworld grew great.” Later, St. Patrick took a sledge hammer and destroyed the golden idol of Cromm Cruaich.  This, then, is the origin of Halloween.

Unfortunately, we still honor this ancient celebration. And as we acknowledge and celebrate it, we are giving honor to a god who demanded the lives and blood of human beings. We are celebrating death, destruction, darkness, demons, violence, hatred, and evil. We are honoring a demon-god who used terror to control the people and whose demands caused strong, brave men to disgrace themselves.

In contrast, Jesus demands nothing from us but asks us to trust Him. He doesn’t demand the lives of our children to appease Him. The only thing that pleases Him is our faith. He is not a God of darkness, but rather Jesus Himself is light. He is a God of love, not fear; of healing and restoration, not violence and destruction. Jesus gives comfort, not terror, to those who look to Him for help. The early settlers who prayed to Him rested in His peace, as we do today, for He is the Prince of Peace. Jesus is the God and Creator of Life, not death. Since there is no evil in Jesus, He never brings harm or disgrace to those who worship Him, and He does not intimidate or deal unjustly. And where Cromm Cruaich is a demon-god, Jesus is holy, righteous, and pure.

The celebration of Halloween is quite obviously a celebration of darkness, death, fear, demons, hatred, violence, and evil. And yet, it’s one of the biggest celebrations of the year. What’s worse, without any thought to what they’re doing, many Christians celebrate it as well.

It is interesting to note that the writers of the ancient Celtic poem referred to Comm Cruaich as having “many mists.” In the same way, 2 Peter 2:17 speaks of those who have turned away from God as “…springs without water and mists driven by a storm, for whom the black darkness has been reserved forever.” This is the god of Halloween. This is whom we choose to ‘agree with’ when we participate, in any way at all, in this celebration.

God equates our relationship with Him to that of a marriage relationship. Many times in the Old Testament He accuses the nation of Israel of adultery and harlotry because of their involvement with spiritual practices other than those He has ordained. The prophet Isaiah pleads with Israel, “Come, house of Jacob, and let us walk in the light of the Lord.” But in the next verse, God tells them that He has abandoned them “because they are filled with influences from the east.” Is. 2:5-6

We know that God is the same yesterday, today, and forever and in the New Testament God continues to speak the same to us today:

 Do not be partakers with them; for you were formally darkness, but now you are Light in the Lord; walk as children of Light…do not participate in the unfruitful deeds of darkness, but instead, even expose them; for it is disgraceful even to speak of the things done by them in secret…therefore be careful how you walk, not as unwise men, but as wise, making the most of your time, because the days are evil. Eph. 5: 7-8, 11, 15-16

 

* Celtic Myth and Legend by Charles Squire

** Celtic Myths and Legends by T.W. Rolleston

——————————————–

Written by Judith Ritchie (c) 2011

Related Articles:

Harry Potter and the Superconsciousness by Ray Yungen

Movie/Book Warning: A warning concerning Stephanie Myer’s best-seller: Twilight by Berit Kjos

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Review: Legend of the Guardians: The Owls of Ga’Hoole

by Berit Kjos
Kjos Ministries

A review of this mystical book series for children and youth

Halloween comes and goes, but the Ga’Hoole owls — with their legends, divination, ghosts, and “hagsfiends” — call for an all-year warning. These guardians fit right into the world’s history of pagan myths and mystical “seers,” and their adventures make their occult suggestions all the more alluring to young readers.

Like our world’s mythical tales, the owls’ treasured ‘legends’ involve spiritism, magic, murder, and hope-filled illusions. And like today’s ‘New Spirituality,’ their beliefs are twisted into enticing heresies that match ‘human’ cravings and mock God’s truths.

Since this book series is full of references to “Glaux” (the name of their god), some readers may even equate these “noble” tales with Christian parables. Without faith in God’s Word and knowledge of His warnings, few are prepared to discern the deceptions. Enticed by the dark, scary thrills, many will gladly accept the lies.

A glimpse of the storyline

Soren, a newly hatched Barn Owl, would soon face plenty of challenges to his faith, life, and liberty. Even before he could fly, he was pushed from his nest by his older brother, Kludd, who planned to kill him as part of a ritual requirement for initiation into the league of the “Pure Ones.” Soren survived the fall, but was quickly abducted by cruel strangers skilled in mind-dulling brainwashing (“moon blinking”) of fledgling owls.

Soren and his best friend escaped and eventually found their way to the great Ga’Hoole tree and its enlightened community of owls. But foes like Kludd and his mate, Nyra, continue to shatter their peace. Kludd’s gifted son Nyroc (who changes his name to Coryn) escapes his parents and the murderous Pure Ones. His exceptional psychic powers lead to amazing victories for the Ga’Hoole community.

Meanwhile, the captivated reader becomes more and more familiar with the dark forces behind those mystical triumphs. Evil seems increasingly normal, while God’s timeless warnings are dismissed as old-fashioned and intolerant:

“Woe to those who call evil good, and good evil; who put darkness for light, and light for darkness…. Woe to those who are wise in their own eyes, and prudent in their own sight!” Isaiah 5:20-21

It’s easy for readers to identify with these fictional owls. Their values, rituals and relationships fit right into the multicultural training in American schools today. In today’s post-Christian world, God’s unchanging Truth has been twisted into enticing deviations that reflect both our changing times and our human inclinations. No doubt Scholastic, the U.S. publisher of the Harry Potter books as well as The Guardians of Ga’Hoole, had something to do with the “timely” message of the books. Click here to read more.

Related Articles:

Movie/Book Warning: A warning concerning Stephanie Myer’s best-seller: Twilight

Harry Potter and the Superconsciousness
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