Marching toward Global Solidarity

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by Berit Kjos

 

During the 1996 UN Conference on Human Settlements (Habitat II), I attended a day-long “Dialogue” on the meaning of “Solidarity” at Istanbul’s elegant Ciragan Palace. Registered as a reporter, I received a list of 21 panel members. It included UNESCO’s Director General Federico Mayor, the now discredited UN leader Maurice Strong, World Bank Vice President Ismail Serageldin, and Millard Fuller who founded Habitat for Humanity. Together with other globalist dignitaries, they would explore the missing factor in the old Soviet version of dialectical materialism: a spiritual foundation for an evolving global ethic.

“To speak of solidarity is to speak of things of the spirit,” began Habitat Secretary-General Wally N’Dow. “For we are well aware that the future of our human settlements… is not just a matter of bricks and mortar but equally a question of attitudes and determination to work for the common good…. This spiritual dimension is the only ingredient that can bind societies together.”

N’Dow had chosen an American moderator who would add credibility to the discussion: Robert McNeil (of McNeil-Lehrer), “one of the gurus, the spiritual lights of the media industry today.” Moments later, McNeil introduced the panel of dignitaries ready to shape the new vision of oneness….

“What’s needed is an interfaith center in every city of the globe,” said James Morton, former dean of the Episcopal Cathedral of St. John the Divine. “The new interfaith centers will honor the rituals of every… faith tradition: Islam, Hinduism, Jain, Christian… and provide opportunity for sacred expression needed to bind the people of the planet into a viable, meaningful, and sustainable solidarity.” Read this entire article.