WorldNetDaily: Pope’s Visit to Jerusalem: Calls for Division of Israel – No Apology for Holocaust

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By Aaron Klein
WorldNetDaily

“Rabbi to pope: Go split Rome”
Pontiff slammed for comments in support of Palestinian state

JERUSALEM–If Pope Benedict XVI so fervently supports a Palestinian state–which would split sections of Israel–he also should divide Rome, charged the leader of a coalition of more than 350 Israeli rabbinic leaders and pulpit rabbis.

“I was shocked to hear that the first thing the pope had to say when he landed in Israel was that the Holy Land must be divided to make room for a Palestinian state,” said Joseph Gerlitzky, rabbi of central Tel Aviv and chairman of the Rabbinical Congress for Peace, which includes some of Israel’s most prominent Jewish leaders.

“I suggest that he divide Rome. The Holy Land was promised to the Jewish people and absolutely no human being on this earth has a right to relinquish even one inch of this land,” Gerlitzky stated.

Gerlitzky made the remarks at a speech today commemorating the Jewish festive day of Lag Ba’Omer, which is about the mid-way point between Passover and the day on which the Jews were said to have received the Torah.

In his opening comments after disembarking at Israel’s international airport yesterday, Benedict called for the creation of a Palestinian state with the hope that Israelis and Palestinians “may live in peace in a homeland of their own within secure and internationally recognized borders….”

The pontiff’s speech yesterday at Jerusalem’s famed Holocaust Memorial Museum has been slammed, largely for stopping short of an apology on behalf of the Catholic Church, which historians charge could have done more to save European Jews during the Holocaust. The pope’s speech did not once mention “Nazis” or “murder.” Click here to read this entire article.

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